Aaron Mendelson Associate Digital Producer, Data

Aaron Mendelson
Contact Aaron Mendelson

Aaron Mendelson is KPCC's Associate Digital Producer for data and interactive projects.

At KPCC, he has used data to shine a light on the avalanche of outside money in local politics, spiking firearms sales, Los Angeles' bicycle infrastructure, and police militarization. He helped build a unique database on officer-involved shootings in Los Angeles County for KPCC's Officer Involved project.

Aaron holds a master's degree from the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. Prior to joining KPCC, he worked as a freelancer for Reuters, Marketplace, KQED and Mother Jones. He got his start in journalism at KFAI in Minneapolis.

Aaron grew up in Iowa. An avid music fan, he is the author of the 2012 book "American R&B: Gospel Grooves, Funky Drummers & Soul Power."


Stories by Aaron Mendelson

Water use rises as everyone forgets the drought

Now that the pressure's off, can we keep saving water? The answer depends on where you ask the question.

SF looks to restrict payments to politicians' pet causes

The San Francisco Ethics Commission is exploring limits on "behested payments," the fundraising practice used by politicians to raise money for pet causes.

Southern California victims of the Las Vegas shooting

The local victims include a Simi Valley school office manager, a Manhattan Beach special education teacher and a Manhattan Beach civilian police employee.

Cops in LA, San Bernardino counties top list of police shootings

New data from the California Department of Justice, show big differences in the rates of police shootings across the state. Ventura County reported the lowest rate.

1 in 4 in Imperial County lives in poverty

New census figures show that one in three children in the state's third-poorest county are living in poverty. Unemployment there is nearly 25 percent.

Water use ticks up again across California

Californians are using more water now than in 2015 and 2016, when mandatory measures were in place to conserve water during a five-year drought.

How affordable housing keeps LA economically segregated

The vast majority of housing for low-income renters in Los Angeles has been built in the county's very poorest neighborhoods. The research says that's a problem.

LA responds to mayor's record-breaking fundraising

Some LA residents reacted with anger on learning of the nearly $32 million in contributions raised by Mayor Eric Garcetti for favored causes, some from companies that do business with the city.

Chart: Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's behested payments

While Los Angeles has tight controls on the amount of money citizens can donate to campaigns, there's no limit on the amounts of cash people, foundations, nonprofits and corporations can donate to government and charity at a politician's behest.

'A tricky area of philanthropy': LA mayor solicits millions for his favored causes

Mayor Eric Garcetti has used a little-known mechanism to raise $31.9 million in four years. Public records show some of the contributors do business with the city.

California police use force at a higher rate against blacks, data shows

The state collected police shooting and use of force data for the first time — and found black people are shot at or hurt at triple their proportion of the population.

Water use jumps in dry, inland Southern California

Californians used five percent more water per capita this June than in 2016, when the state was suffering through a fifth year of drought. Gains were higher in some areas of SoCal.

A fairytale ending for (at least some) Alfred Angelo bridesmaids

At least three bridesmaids got their dresses, despite the company's abrupt closure. Its bankruptcy filing suggests more than 2,000 Californians await dresses.

Port proposal to clean up the air could cost up to $14B

The plan relies heavily on incentives to switch trucks and equipment over to zero emission technology, which critics say will not be ready, or cost effective, in time.

How legal pot could cut California’s police searches dramatically

Colorado and Washington saw searches by police officers fall sharply after legalizing marijuana — a trend that could have implications for California.