Aaron Mendelson Associate Digital Producer, Data

Aaron Mendelson
Contact Aaron Mendelson

Aaron Mendelson is KPCC's Associate Digital Producer for data and interactive projects.

At KPCC, he has used data to shine a light on the avalanche of outside money in local politics, spiking firearms sales, Los Angeles' bicycle infrastructure, and police militarization. He helped build a unique database on officer-involved shootings in Los Angeles County for KPCC's Officer Involved project.

Aaron holds a master's degree from the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. Prior to joining KPCC, he worked as a freelancer for Reuters, Marketplace, KQED and Mother Jones. He got his start in journalism at KFAI in Minneapolis.

Aaron grew up in Iowa. An avid music fan, he is the author of the 2012 book "American R&B: Gospel Grooves, Funky Drummers & Soul Power."


Stories by Aaron Mendelson

LA scrubs away 30 million square feet of graffiti each year

In recent years, the city has received record numbers of complaints about graffiti from citizens—more than 120,000 in 2014, a number 2015 is on pace to top.

Kamala Harris' crime data portal leaves out key details

California Attorney General Kamala Harris debuted a new website for the state's crime data, but users will find far less information than the state actually collects.

Watch a month of graffiti cleanup in Los Angeles

In the first month of 2015, graffiti abatement crews cleaned away 270,000 square feet of graffiti, 46 football fields' worth of the stuff.

LAUSD cuts ties to military weapons program

The move follows controversies over grenade launchers and a mine resistant vehicle the district obtained through the program, known as 1033.

Drought cutbacks challenge SoCal water officials at home

Many water officials in Southern California will need to cut back more at home to help their districts meet reduction targets, a KPCC analysis has found.

Map: Where campers and RVs are homes in Los Angeles County

Homelessness is on the rise in Los Angeles County, up 12 percent in the last two years. And more and more homeless people are sleeping in vehicles, including RVs and campers. KPCC mapped the areas of L.A. County that are home to people living in those vehicles.

LA County raises minimum wage in unincorporated areas

County supervisors followed L.A. city leaders in increasing the county's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020. The decision will affect those who work in unincorporated areas of the county.

How much do 'open data' portals cost governments?

Data portals have sprung up across Southern California, and could expand further if bills in the California legislature pass this session. So how much do they cost?

LAPD has killed more people than any other agency in 2015, data show

The Los Angeles Police Department has killed 10 people so far in 2015, more people than any other agency in the nation.

Audit finds 'exceptionally high' overtime costs at LADOT

Employees at L.A.'s transportation department maintained "nearly super-human work schedules" and claimed overtime at rates higher than any other department except the LAFD.

Do California cops have restricted military equipment?

President Obama signed an executive order this week halting the transfer of certain military equipment to police agencies. How much of it is in So Cal?

LAUSD board election drawing big PAC money

Political action committee spending in this year's Los Angeles Unified election is 15 times higher than it was 2009. Many donors aren't disclosed ahead of elections.

Drought: Rich SoCal cities use more water than poorer neighbors

Residents of higher-income areas in Southern California used more water in March than their lower income neighbors, a KPCC analysis found.

Income and water use in Southern California

Many eyes have turned to the manicured lawns, swimming pools and fountains in wealthy communities, with the assumption that wealthy Californians use more than their share of the state's water. So do they?

California legislature looks to open up government data

The California legislature is considering a trio of bills that would crack open the state's vast amounts of public data.