Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Correspondent

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo reports on K-12 education and higher education for Southern California Public Radio.

He’s been a reporter at SCPR since 2000 and in that time has covered many different types of stories including elections, transportation, fires, and the arts. His most memorable stories are the on-site reports at the 2007 May Day Melee protests at L.A.’s MacArthur Park, a fatal apartment collapse that shed light on L.A.'s dearth of housing inspectors, University of California students coping with hunger, South Gate overcoming political corruption, the 25th anniversary of L.A.’s seminal 1977 punk rock scene, social work interns helping students from military families cope, political dirty tricks funded by public funds in the Inglewood Unified School District, a profile of prominent L.A. poet Wanda Coleman, and a feature about Adolfo’s name appearing on the TV show "The Simpsons".

Adolfo's awards include the 2006 L.A. Press Club’s Radio Journalist of the Year and a regional Edward R. Murrow honor.

2016 is Adolfo’s 20th year in public radio news. He was hired in 1996 by KPBS-FM in San Diego as a producer for the daily news talk show These Days. He lives in Long Beach with his wife and kids.


Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

USC professors push campus to lead in Trump resistance

USC faculty say Trump's immigration policies will hurt U.S. higher education because they send the message that foreigners are not welcome in this country.

School layoffs planned in several school districts

Some school districts sent hundreds of layoff notices to staff. Enrollment drops are hurting funding for most school districts, some more severely than others.

New school evaluation tool includes non-academic data

California's new School Dashboard uses color coding, from blue to red, and pie charts to show school performance, using academic and non-academic indicators.

Inglewood schools officials fight Green Dot charter

Approving a new charter high school in Inglewood, school officials say, would heighten segregation of English learners, learning disabled, and black students.

Campaign to reach undocumented college students pays off

Amid concerns that federal officials would tap into their information, a record number of undocumented students apply for state financial aid.

Tears, laughter shed at funeral for slain Whittier officer

The services for 53-year-old Whittier Officer Keith Lane Boyer will begin Friday morning with a memorial at Calvary Chapel in Downey.

Sacramento wants to protect student data from ICE

Lawmakers want to lock student data from federal immigration agents, but a court order could give federal officials access to the information.

Schools in affluent areas call Brown's budget inadequate

Leaders in six school districts, including South Pasadena and Manhattan Beach, say Brown's plan won't make up for extra money they have to pay for employee pensions.

College graduation initiatives criticized in state report

The 23-campus California State University is asking for more than double this year's state funding next fiscal year to pay for its Graduation Initiative.

The joint college class taught by a SoCal and Mexican university

When University of La Verne administrators planned a leadership class to include students from Mexico, they didn't count on today's political tensions.

LA-area lawyers say feds ramped up arrests of immigrants

Los Angeles area attorneys report they've gotten a higher than usual number of calls from relatives of undocumented immigrants arrested by ICE officials.

A suggested education overhaul for incarcerated youth

California budgets $140 million for the education of more than 8,000 youth in jails. Observers say those programs have little accountability.

Santa Monica shelter offering beds to college students

For the last four months, a UCLA student group with a membership of over four dozen students has been running a shelter for homeless college students.

SoCal colleges react to Trump's immigration order

One university official told KPCC that the executive order is affecting the university's ability to attract students and faculty from around the world.

Cut to state scholarship could hit Southern California hard

Most of the students who currently receive the Middle Class Scholarship, awarded to those whose families make less than $156,000 annually, attend Southern California campuses.