Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Reporter

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez is an education reporter for KPCC. He's been a reporter at the station since 2000.

After college, in the mid-1990s, Guzman-Lopez began reporting freelance arts and culture stories, mostly about the red-hot rock en español scene, to the San Diego Union-Tribune, the Chicago Tribune, and the Tijuana newspaper La Tarde. He got his first public radio job at KPBS-FM in San Diego in 1996 as a news talk show producer. He freelanced radio features to Latino USA, Marketplace and other national shows. At KPBS he hosted and produced a daily, Gen-X arts and culture show called "The Lounge" which featured in-studio performances by Howard Jones and Sean Lennon with the band Cibo Matto.

Guzman-Lopez's reporting at KPCC has included the South Gate city hall corruption scandal; the L.A. mayoral campaigns of James Hahn and Antonio Villaraigosa; the SB1070 protests in Phoenix, the 2007 May Day melee; and coverage of L.A. Unified Superintendents Roy Romer, David Brewer, Ramon Cortines, and John Deasy.

Guzman-Lopez was born in Mexico City and grew up in Tijuana and San Diego.He now lives in Long Beach with his wife and two kids and is always open to hear traffic tips for the 110, 710, or the 5 freeways to downtown L.A.


Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

California education groups mostly happy with budget plan

Gov. Jerry Brown's budget plan revision provided what many expected: a windfall for education. But not everyone is pleased with the results.

AG to California colleges: work with police on assault cases

Attorney General Kamala Harris told California colleges and universities to collaborate with local police in addressing student complaints of sexual assault.

California budget: How teachers, community colleges will use extra state funds

Gov. Brown's revised budget is due Thursday, and beneficiaries of an expected revenue windfall — schools and community colleges — know how they want to spend it.

Students help teach as district tackles Common Core math

The Downey Unified School District has taken an approach to math classes under Common Core that has students talking and teaching.

Ex-Corinthian students discouraged from for-profit colleges

Legal Aid warns former students of Corinthian Colleges against enrolling in another for-profit campus without understanding the impact on their student debt.

LAUSD board seeking fix for college prep requirements

A policy aimed at getting Los Angeles Unified students prepared for college threatens to derail graduation for students unless a solution is found.

Report: Latinos need support to increase UC admissions

Campaign for College Opportunity says Latinos are less likely to hold college degrees than other racial/ethnic groups, trailing in college readiness, enrollment and degree completion rates.

Jury sides against CSU students in $80M fee case

California State University system argued it should not have to reimburse millions of dollars to students who paid additional fees in 2009.

State graduation rates show 'unacceptable' gaps

Data show California's African-American and Latino students continue to graduate high school at rates lower than that of their white and Asian classmates.

Corinthian colleges closed, leaving students seeking answers

College officials — and the California Department of Consumer Affairs — have scheduled meetings with students beginning Tuesday after the campuses were closed.

Judge denies motion to rid high schools of 'phantom' classes

The Cruz v. California lawsuit alleges state education officials allow practices at public schools that deny students of significant amounts of learning time.

Parking ban on streets around some high schools stirs debate

Mission Viejo is the latest community to debate whether parking should be banned on public streets around public high schools for those other than residents.

Many parents feel uninformed about Common Core tests

A new survey by the Public Policy Institute of California indicates parents feel ill-informed about the new standardized tests underway in public schools.

LAUSD board OKs teacher contract, though deficit projected

The L.A. Unified board cleared the way for the teachers' agreement to go to union members for a vote, but officials estimate it will create a $559 million deficit.

LAUSD board to vote on tentative teacher deal

The Los Angeles Unified board is set to meet in closed session to discuss a tentative teacher contract, although the total cost of the agreement remains undisclosed.