Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Correspondent

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo reports on K-12 education and higher education for Southern California Public Radio.

He’s been a reporter at SCPR since 2000 and in that time has covered many different types of stories including elections, transportation, fires, and the arts. His most memorable stories are the on-site reports at the 2007 May Day Melee protests at L.A.’s MacArthur Park, a fatal apartment collapse that shed light on L.A.'s dearth of housing inspectors, University of California students coping with hunger, South Gate overcoming political corruption, the 25th anniversary of L.A.’s seminal 1977 punk rock scene, social work interns helping students from military families cope, political dirty tricks funded by public funds in the Inglewood Unified School District, a profile of prominent L.A. poet Wanda Coleman, and a feature about Adolfo’s name appearing on the TV show "The Simpsons".

Adolfo's awards include the 2006 L.A. Press Club’s Radio Journalist of the Year and a regional Edward R. Murrow honor.

2016 is Adolfo’s 20th year in public radio news. He was hired in 1996 by KPBS-FM in San Diego as a producer for the daily news talk show These Days. He lives in Long Beach with his wife and kids.


Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

State wage hike could mean lights out for after-school programs

A 2002 ballot measure created state funded after-school programs, but now there's not enough money to keep all of them open, advocates say.

Trump effect: Fewer foreign applications to US colleges

Nearly 40 percent of institutions represented in a recent survey reported a drop in applications from international students.

"Avocado" is from Nahuatl, is the same word as "testicle"

English has borrowed more than a few words from the ancient language of the Aztecs, including avocado and coyote.

Questions linger over closure of Whittier Law School

Whittier College sold it's law school property for $35 million three months before making the decision to close the law school. Faculty said they were blindsided.

Pasadena schools turn realtors into allies

By training realtors about the progress of Pasadena public schools, administrators hope to attract families who may have been tempted to educate their kids elsewhere.

Cal State's remedial program isn't helping students

Nearly 25,000 incoming freshmen enrolled in California State University's remedial summer program in 2016. The program is called Early Start.

Community college remedial program 'broken,' advocates say

Most California community college students are placed in remedial education classes — but researchers say the way that decision is made is mostly inaccurate.

The 'school bus effect' could cut chronic absences

Taking the school bus involves planning and routines. New research suggests learning those skills in kindergarten can help schools reduce absences.

Teaching kids soft social skills

More and more schools are integrating the teaching of skills like perseverance and empathy in academic lessons such as math and English.

Community colleges fund a college pipeline for foster youth

California has more than 60,000 foster youth. About 3 percent go on to earn college degrees. Three community colleges are targeting 9th graders for help.

Leader for troubled Inglewood schools says he’s leaving

Inglewood schools have been under state control since 2012. There are some key decisions coming as the state appoints a new trustee.

Cal State Northridge students protest Border Patrol recruiters on campus

Students said university officials talked out of both sides of their mouths, vowing to protect undocumented students then inviting Border Patrol recruiters.

Lawyers object to Calif. school districts collecting citizenship info

On enrollment forms, some school districts ask for students' U.S. citizenship, Social Security numbers, and whether they were born in another country.

USC professors push campus to lead in Trump resistance

USC faculty say Trump's immigration policies will hurt U.S. higher education because they send the message that foreigners are not welcome in this country.

School layoffs planned in several school districts

Some school districts sent hundreds of layoff notices to staff. Enrollment drops are hurting funding for most school districts, some more severely than others.