Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Reporter

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez is an education reporter for KPCC. He's been a reporter at the station since 2000.

After college, in the mid-1990s, Guzman-Lopez began reporting freelance arts and culture stories, mostly about the red-hot rock en español scene, to the San Diego Union-Tribune, the Chicago Tribune, and the Tijuana newspaper La Tarde. He got his first public radio job at KPBS-FM in San Diego in 1996 as a news talk show producer. He freelanced radio features to Latino USA, Marketplace and other national shows. At KPBS he hosted and produced a daily, Gen-X arts and culture show called "The Lounge" which featured in-studio performances by Howard Jones and Sean Lennon with the band Cibo Matto.

Guzman-Lopez's reporting at KPCC has included the South Gate city hall corruption scandal; the L.A. mayoral campaigns of James Hahn and Antonio Villaraigosa; the SB1070 protests in Phoenix, the 2007 May Day melee; and coverage of L.A. Unified Superintendents Roy Romer, David Brewer, Ramon Cortines, and John Deasy.

Guzman-Lopez was born in Mexico City and grew up in Tijuana and San Diego.He now lives in Long Beach with his wife and two kids and is always open to hear traffic tips for the 110, 710, or the 5 freeways to downtown L.A.


Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Inglewood school funds were used to attack school board candidate

Public funds meant to educate Inglewood students were instead used to benefit a board member’s re-election campaign in 2009, court testimony and interviews show.

Controversial bill would expand California teacher tenure

Bill seeks to give tenure to California teachers in very small school districts, county offices of education, and vocational programs. But one lawmaker said it goes against a recent L.A. court decision.

Teacher tenure ruling shows strength of union adversaries

The Vergara v. California court decision inserts a new player, Students Matter, into the mix of groups seeking to influence education policy in Sacramento.

Vergara trial: Calif. judge says state teacher protections unconstitutional (updated)

The ruling finds that California teacher tenure, firing and discipline procedures are unconstitutional because they violate children’s right to an adequate education.

As disabled students on campus rise, so does help with tests

A growing number of students with autism and mental health problems are enrolling in college. Universities are having to adapt, especially during final exams.

After years of cuts, Cal State hiring more faculty

CSU officials hope the hiring of up to 700 more full-time faculty members for the coming academic year will help students graduate more quickly.

Advocates: California schools wasting students' time

Lawsuit alleges schools in Los Angeles, Compton assign students to “service classes” where they make copies or help school staff instead of learning.

7 fees public schools can't charge you, and a few they can

California law now bans schools from charging for sports teams, high school graduation, summer school. Parents are still asked to contribute — but differently.

Santa Ana kidnapping: Prosecutors charge man with rape, 4 other felonies (updated)

Isidro Medrano Garcia was charged Thursday with five felony counts after being arrested on suspicion of kidnapping a 15-year-old girl a decade ago and sexually assaulting her for years.

California woman found 10 years after kidnapping

A woman who was 15 when she disappeared 10 years ago from her California home has contacted police and says she was held against her will for years.

English Learner services in public schools: How well are they working?

California's massive English Learner services involves testing, monitoring student learning, and teacher professional development.

DOJ probing California's services to English learner students

The Justice Department is looking into whether officials are providing proper services to 1.4 million students in California, according to court records.

Elite science fair shows what's possible outside classroom

The Intel International Science and Engineering Fair shows off mind-blowing teenage experiments. Officials said kids aren't learning this stuff in class.

UC Irvine to use Google Glass throughout medical school

UC Irvine's medical school announced it'll start using 40 Google Glass devices this year in everything from anatomy classes to teaching surgical techniques.

Gov. Brown proposes another $242m for schools

Among the added spending in the "May revise" is nearly $30 million to improve computer networks at Califoria schools for standardized testing.