Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Correspondent

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo reports on K-12 education and higher education for Southern California Public Radio.

He’s been a reporter at SCPR since 2000 and in that time has covered many different types of stories including elections, transportation, fires, and the arts. His most memorable stories are the on-site reports at the 2007 May Day Melee protests at L.A.’s MacArthur Park, a fatal apartment collapse that shed light on L.A.'s dearth of housing inspectors, University of California students coping with hunger, South Gate overcoming political corruption, the 25th anniversary of L.A.’s seminal 1977 punk rock scene, social work interns helping students from military families cope, political dirty tricks funded by public funds in the Inglewood Unified School District, a profile of prominent L.A. poet Wanda Coleman, and a feature about Adolfo’s name appearing on the TV show "The Simpsons".

Adolfo's awards include the 2006 L.A. Press Club’s Radio Journalist of the Year and a regional Edward R. Murrow honor.

2016 is Adolfo’s 20th year in public radio news. He was hired in 1996 by KPBS-FM in San Diego as a producer for the daily news talk show These Days. He lives in Long Beach with his wife and kids.


Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

LAUSD plan to cut instructional days gets mixed reviews

Teachers are giving mixed reviews to a cost-cutting proposal the Los Angeles Unified School District and its teachers union announced during the weekend. The plan, still subject to approval by the union's rank and file, would shorten the current and following school year to help close a state funding deficit.

Music teacher facing layoff uses music to lift her spirits

California educators say school districts have told about 20,000 teachers that by summer they may lose their jobs. One public school instructor tries to distract herself from the prospect of a layoff by concentrating on her work.

Cal Poly Pomona hosts cyber attack competition

Computer hackers are ready to throw every kind of virus and malicious software at business IT departments this weekend. It’s part of a simulation for a university competition meant to prepare students for the very real and ugly world of cyber protection.

Students, parents protest Green Dot school closure

About 200 Los Angeles high school students marched and took buses today to their charter school’s headquarters and protested its decision to close their campus.

L.A. Unified parents speak out against inter-district transfer cuts

Parents spoke passionately today against a new Los Angeles Unified School District policy that will drastically cut back the number of students allowed to enroll in schools outside the district.

Southland reacts to health bill

The impending passage of health insurance reform stands to affect the vast majority of people in the United States — regardless of whether they’re citizens. Patients at some Orange County clinics offered mixed reactions to the changes.

L.A. Cultural Affairs staff vents frustrations over cuts

At a meeting this morning Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs managers told employees that the agency will enact serious staff and facilities cuts. The aim is to help L.A. city government close a nearly $500 million deficit next fiscal year.

LA Cultural Affairs Department to cut nearly half of staff

Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs chief Olga Garay has confirmed to KPCC that she’s moving forward with layoffs and job cuts that’ll slash the department’s workforce by almost half.

Panel recommends L.A. Unified teacher overhauls

A 35-member L.A. Unified School District panel meeting tonight expects to forward recommendations to the district’s board of education. If they go into effect, they’d significantly change the way the district evaluates and pays its teachers.

Southland Salvadorans commemorate murdered archbishop

In the next couple of weeks Salvadoran groups in Southern California plan to commemorate the assassination 30 years ago of Oscar Romero, that country’s Roman Catholic archbishop. His death marked the beginning of a bloody civil war that led to the emigration of hundreds of thousands of refugees to the United States.

Federal officials to investigate LAUSD English learner services

The Civil Rights Office of the U.S. Department of Education is reportedly investigating the delivery of English learner services at the Los Angeles Unified School District.

Historic LA County sites receive national preservation grants

The Washington, D.C.-based National Trust for Historic Preservation announced today the L.A. County recipients of a dozen grants to preserve historic treasures for future generations.

Italian teaching method taking root in L.A.

A free exhibit in Santa Monica sheds light on an educational model begun in Italy 60 years ago that’s taken root in the Southland.

State educators identify lowest performing schools for overhaul

Last year’s federal stimulus funds for public schools required educators to identify — and take action to turn around — the lowest performing schools. California released a preliminary list of those schools today.

School districts make layoff lists

Many school districts are sending preliminary layoff notices in the mail this week in anticipation of a deadline next week. Once those lists are out school officials still have plenty of heavy lifting before they complete the process.