Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Reporter

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez is an education reporter for KPCC. He's been a reporter at the station since 2000.

After college, in the mid-1990s, Guzman-Lopez began reporting freelance arts and culture stories, mostly about the red-hot rock en español scene, to the San Diego Union-Tribune, the Chicago Tribune, and the Tijuana newspaper La Tarde. He got his first public radio job at KPBS-FM in San Diego in 1996 as a news talk show producer. He freelanced radio features to Latino USA, Marketplace and other national shows. At KPBS he hosted and produced a daily, Gen-X arts and culture show called "The Lounge" which featured in-studio performances by Howard Jones and Sean Lennon with the band Cibo Matto.

Guzman-Lopez's reporting at KPCC has included the South Gate city hall corruption scandal; the L.A. mayoral campaigns of James Hahn and Antonio Villaraigosa; the SB1070 protests in Phoenix, the 2007 May Day melee; and coverage of L.A. Unified Superintendents Roy Romer, David Brewer, Ramon Cortines, and John Deasy.

Guzman-Lopez was born in Mexico City and grew up in Tijuana and San Diego.He now lives in Long Beach with his wife and two kids and is always open to hear traffic tips for the 110, 710, or the 5 freeways to downtown L.A.

Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

LAUSD, superintendent sued in sexual harassment case

A lawsuit says the Los Angeles Unified School District failed in its responsibility to investigate if Superintendent Ramon Cortines sexually harassed an employee.

Schools new mandatory abuse reporting training now online

All California school employees, including substitute teachers, are required to show proof of having had annual training to spot child abuse or neglect.

Followers of late educator Sal Castro keep his mission alive

In 1963, Sal Castro founded the Chicano Youth Leadership Conference to help students apply for college. Alumni include former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

Schools expelling students with low grades under scrutiny

Public Safety Academy, a public charter school in San Bernardino preparing teens for police and firefighter careers, had grade requirements that violated state law.

Jefferson High class fixes taking hold after court order

Jefferson High School in South Los Angeles is seeing improvements as it climbs back from months of class scheduling problems tied to the data system known as MiSiS.

Judge asked to order class schedule fixes at 5 high schools

Students at five California high schools continue to be enrolled in "service" periods with no academic content and "home" periods during which they're sent home.

LAUSD data highlights classes with large enrollments

LAUSD Superintendent Ramon Cortines directs administrators to keep classes with enrollments as large as 45-plus students in check.

Displaced Huntington Beach students return to campus

The learning routine of about 1,600 students has been in upheaval as they've been displaced from their Huntington Beach schools during asbestos cleanup.

Teacher jobs, once sparse, poised for comeback

California educators expect more teachers will become credentialed as school districts ramp up their hiring after years of layoffs and few openings.

Tuition plan gets a push from Biden, shrug from some

Vice President Joe Biden promoted the administration's free community college tuition plan, but it's California's cost of living that's the real problem, he's told.

Should CA follow AZ’s lead and make civics test a graduation requirement?

After success in Arizona, civics education advocates are looking to push through a requirement in California that public school students pass an exam based on one given for U.S. citizenship.

8 SoCal community colleges to offer bachelor's degrees

Community college campuses received approval to offer four-year bachelor's degrees in industrial automation, dental hygiene and other in-demand fields.

Group targets California for student civics test requirement

Some educators support a civics test to graduate from California high schools, but others say students already take too many tests.

Should California postpone using new student test scores?

Results from new statewide standardized tests will likely be low. But that's fine, some say, because any results will begin to measure progress.

Duncan calls for revamp of 'No Child Left Behind' but backs testing

U.S. Secretary Arne Duncan's call for a revision of No Child Left Behind also included a renewal of the administration's support for annual testing.