Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Correspondent

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo reports on K-12 education and higher education for Southern California Public Radio.

He’s been a reporter at SCPR since 2000 and in that time has covered many different types of stories including elections, transportation, fires, and the arts. His most memorable stories are the on-site reports at the 2007 May Day Melee protests at L.A.’s MacArthur Park, a fatal apartment collapse that shed light on L.A.'s dearth of housing inspectors, University of California students coping with hunger, South Gate overcoming political corruption, the 25th anniversary of L.A.’s seminal 1977 punk rock scene, social work interns helping students from military families cope, political dirty tricks funded by public funds in the Inglewood Unified School District, a profile of prominent L.A. poet Wanda Coleman, and a feature about Adolfo’s name appearing on the TV show "The Simpsons".

Adolfo's awards include the 2006 L.A. Press Club’s Radio Journalist of the Year and a regional Edward R. Murrow honor.

2016 is Adolfo’s 20th year in public radio news. He was hired in 1996 by KPBS-FM in San Diego as a producer for the daily news talk show These Days. He lives in Long Beach with his wife and kids.


Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Long Beach coffee shop feels effects of slow economy

The economic downturn's forcing many people to cut back on luxuries. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez talked to the owner of a small coffee roasting company in Long Beach who's struggling to convince customers that gourmet coffee is indispensable.

Southland group remembers 1968 Mexico City massacre

Forty years ago today soldiers shot and killed dozens of people at an antigovernment rally in Mexico City. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez says Los Angeles activist groups have organized an afternoon of performances this weekend under the motto, "We will not forget."

LA Chamber Orchestra celebrates 40th anniversary

For the last century in classical music, the dominant force has been the large symphony orchestra of about one hundred musicians. Smaller chamber orchestras have worked hard to carve out audiences in the shadow of their larger, more flashy siblings. The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra has done just that for four decades. The orchestra opens its season and celebrates its 40th anniversary Saturday night. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez has the story.

Echo Park is center for growing experimental music scene

The roots of avant garde music extend back to World War Two when American and European musicians created experimental compositions. Experimental music's signature work is John Cage's composition Four Minutes, Thirty-three Seconds. It's that much silence, intended to turn listeners' ears to the sounds that surround them. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports that a new generation inspired by experimental composers and performers is feeding a growing music scene in and around L.A.'s Echo Park neighborhood.

Pasadena Unified overhauls its middle schools

Increasingly, California school districts are rethinking instruction at their middle schools. Weak test scores and new research about what works is jump-starting some of the changes. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports that one Southland school district is ahead of the pack.

State Appeals Court Rejects In-State Tuition for Illegal Immigrants

A state appeals court has ruled that illegal immigrants enrolled in California public colleges can't pay reduced in-state resident tuition. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez has the details.

Educators Sound Off on State Budget Proposal

Sacramento's withheld funding from schools as lawmakers squabbled for more than two months about how to close a multibillion dollar deficit. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez talked with some school administrators to gauge their responses to the budget deal.

Fewer High School Students Pass California's Exit Exam

State education officials are applauding the latest results from the mandatory California High School Exit Exam. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez has more on the figures released on Tuesday.

LAUSD Improves Standardized Test Scores

The state's yearly Academic Performance Index scores are out. They went up statewide. The Los Angeles Unified schools as a whole also showed improvement. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez has the story.

After 11 Years, LA Unified Opens Most Expensive School to Date

After years of controversy, drama, and emotion-filled board meetings, the Roybal Learning Center, formerly known as the Belmont Learning Complex, opened its doors to students Wednesday. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez has the story.

Glendale Unified Inaugurates Unusual German-Immersion Kindergarten

Many public schools in the Southland welcomed students to their first day of school Tuesday. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez visited a campus where the youngest students are pretty sure to learn the meaning of the word "kindergarten."

Gallery Exhibit Explores East Los Angeles D.J. Culture

DJ culture, with its turntables, record scratching, and fashions, is ever-present in mainstream television, movies and advertising. An exhibit at a downtown L.A. gallery argues that East L.A. DJ's as far back as 30 years ago and the Eastside parties where they played constitute an overlooked chapter of DJ culture. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports about the gallery's efforts to unearth cultural history.

Getty Musuem Taps New Director

The Getty Museum has hired Michael Brand, the director of the Virginia Museum of Fine Art, to be its new director. The appointment comes as several Getty officials find themselves under investigation.

Undocumented Student Struggles to Raise Money to Attend Elite University

If you're about to enter college, it's time to nail down plans to move into student housing and probably past time to secure your plan to pay for tuition, fees, and living expenses. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports about one Southland high school graduate who's struggled to raise the money he needs before he's supposed to enroll at one of California's elite universities next month.

College Administrators Tackle Student Enrollment Problems

This week in Los Angeles, college and university administrators from around the country tackled a vexing issue in higher education: how to open the doors to more students and keep them enrolled. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez has the story.