Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Correspondent

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo reports on K-12 education and higher education for Southern California Public Radio.

He’s been a reporter at SCPR since 2000 and in that time has covered many different types of stories including elections, transportation, fires, and the arts. His most memorable stories are the on-site reports at the 2007 May Day Melee protests at L.A.’s MacArthur Park, a fatal apartment collapse that shed light on L.A.'s dearth of housing inspectors, University of California students coping with hunger, South Gate overcoming political corruption, the 25th anniversary of L.A.’s seminal 1977 punk rock scene, social work interns helping students from military families cope, political dirty tricks funded by public funds in the Inglewood Unified School District, a profile of prominent L.A. poet Wanda Coleman, and a feature about Adolfo’s name appearing on the TV show "The Simpsons".

Adolfo's awards include the 2006 L.A. Press Club’s Radio Journalist of the Year and a regional Edward R. Murrow honor.

2016 is Adolfo’s 20th year in public radio news. He was hired in 1996 by KPBS-FM in San Diego as a producer for the daily news talk show These Days. He lives in Long Beach with his wife and kids.


Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Mural Artists Upset Over Removal of Paintings

About a month ago, the Friends of the Los Angeles River received permits to hold a two-day mural painting event where the river meets the Arroyo Seco. The purpose was to beautify hundreds of feet of drab concrete banks. But the project's turned sour. Event organizers say an L.A. County supervisor called a meeting afterward to criticize the murals' content and demand their removal. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez has the story.

Undocumented Immigrant Arellano Arrested in L.A., Deported

For a year, a Methodist church in Chicago granted sanctuary to Elvira Arellano, an undocumented immigrant. Federal immigration officials did not move to arrest her at that church. But Arellano was in Los Angeles this weekend and officers were waiting. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

LAPD Practices New Crowd-Control Techniques at Rally

The LAPD arrested ten pro-immigrant activists who took over a busy intersection in Downtown L.A. today. It was one of the first times police officers used new crowd-control techniques adopted after the May Day confrontation between police and protestors at MacArthur Park. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

Supervisors Meet to Discuss King-Harbor's Closing, Possible Future

At a meeting Monday, L.A. County Supervisors pledged to re-open the troubled King-Harbor Hospital in less than a year and a half. They may try again to run it, or turn it over to private management, with new administrators and employees in either case. County health officials closed the facility's emergency room on Friday and ordered the entire hospital shut down in less than two weeks. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

Some San Diego Evacuees Sheltering in Orange County

The American Red Cross is sheltering hundreds of fire evacuees at two Orange County facilities. The first is at El Modena High School in Orange. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports from the second one in the city of Lake Forest.

Federal Immigration Officials Announce Largest Raid Ever

For the last few weeks, pro-immigrant activists protested federal immigration raids in the Southland. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports that today, immigration officials revealed those raids have been part of a two week operation that's turned out to be its biggest to date.

Long Beach Student's Project Blends Exercise and Art

Cal State Long Beach student Sierra Brown took the long way to school on Monday. She swam 11 miles through the ports to her campus as part of an art project. Brown dreamed up the "Port To Class Supercommute" as a way of encouraging people to get out of their cars and take alternative forms of transportation.

Latino WWII Veterans Offer Thoughts on Ken Burns Documentary

KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez joined two Latino World War II veterans as they watched the first installment of Ken Burns' 15-hour documentary, "The War," on Sunday night. The filmmaker added interviews with Latino veterans after he was criticized for ignoring the stories of Latinos.

City of L.A. Honors Argentinean Music Producer

Thirty years ago, an Argentinean hippie who'd been jailed in his home country for playing subversive rock and roll immigrated to Los Angeles. That hippie's become a clean-cut, influential record producer with two Academy Awards under his belt. This week, says KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez, L.A. City Hall honored his career.

LAUSD Board Approves Charter Company to Run Locke High School

L.A. Unified voted Tuesday on a first: handing over management of Locke High School in South Los Angeles to a charter school company. The vote took place after three hours of heated public comment about the future of reform at the nation's second-largest school district. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

May Day Claims Filed Against City of Los Angeles

On Thursday, lawyers filed the largest batch of claims so far arising from a violent incident between Los Angeles police officers and protestors at MacArthur Park in May. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.

Pieces of Historic African American Art Collection to be Auctioned

A year and a half ago, KPCC reported on a Los Angeles private collection of African American art painstakingly put together between the 1950s and 1980s. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports 94 of the most valuable pieces are set to be sold at auction by a New York gallery in a few months.

Nueva Trova Music Movement Grows in Southland

A Latin American musical form called "nueva trova" enjoyed a heyday during the protest movements of the 1960s and '70s. The music traveled north in immigrants' cultural knapsacks. The Bay Area's maintained a strong trova scene for 20 years, fostered by Chilean immigrants. In the Southland, trova hasn't taken root until recently. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports on a young generation of musicians drawn to the music's message of love and social justice.

Late Writer's East Hollywood House May Be Torn Down

The East Hollywood courtyard apartment where writer Charles Bukowski wrote his first novels could be torn down. Bukowski's fans learned of the news while they were planning events to celebrate the late writer's birthday. Bukowski would have turned 87 on Thursday.

Federal Regulators Pull King-Harbor's Funding

Federal officials announced today that King Harbor hospital in South L.A. has failed a second audit of its facilities and quality of care. The federal government plans to cut off funding next week. Without that money the hospital's operators, the County of Los Angeles, can't keep it open in its current configuration. KPCC's Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports.