Adolfo Guzman-Lopez Education Correspondent

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez
Contact Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

Adolfo reports on K-12 education and higher education for Southern California Public Radio.

He’s been a reporter at SCPR since 2000 and in that time has covered many different types of stories including elections, transportation, fires, and the arts. His most memorable stories are the on-site reports at the 2007 May Day Melee protests at L.A.’s MacArthur Park, a fatal apartment collapse that shed light on L.A.'s dearth of housing inspectors, University of California students coping with hunger, South Gate overcoming political corruption, the 25th anniversary of L.A.’s seminal 1977 punk rock scene, social work interns helping students from military families cope, political dirty tricks funded by public funds in the Inglewood Unified School District, a profile of prominent L.A. poet Wanda Coleman, and a feature about Adolfo’s name appearing on the TV show "The Simpsons".

Adolfo's awards include the 2006 L.A. Press Club’s Radio Journalist of the Year and a regional Edward R. Murrow honor.

2016 is Adolfo’s 20th year in public radio news. He was hired in 1996 by KPBS-FM in San Diego as a producer for the daily news talk show These Days. He lives in Long Beach with his wife and kids.


Stories by Adolfo Guzman-Lopez

South L.A. Residents Sound Off on Rally Violence

The FBI has agreed to a request by Los Angeles police chief Bill Bratton to investigate the violence that followed Tuesday's immigration rally at MacArthur Park. The violence has been the talk of many Angelenos.

LA Mayor: MacArthur Park Scuffle "Wrong"

LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke in LA for the first time about Tuesday's violent protest in MacArthur Park. The mayor cut short a trade mission to answer the growing outcry about LAPD use of force at the march.

L.A. Immigrant Rights Rally Turns Violent

One of two large pro-immigrant protests in Los Angeles yesterday ended in violence. Los Angeles police officers in riot gear fired rubber bullets and used batons to disperse thousands of people. Several, including journalists, were injured.

Hate Watchdog Group Issues Warning About Southland Professor

The Southern Poverty Law Center is out with a warning that a Southland professor's academic research fuels the agenda of white supremacist groups. The professor insists he doesn't support the views of those groups.

Japanese-Born Architect Will Chair Prestigious UCLA Department

UCLA has hired Japanese-born Hitoshi Abe to head the school's Department of Architecture and Urban Design.

Jewish Symphony Takes Music Education to Classrooms

The Los Angeles Jewish Symphony holds workshops for elementary school students to introduce them to orchestra music and to teach the youngsters about the ancient culture of Spain's Jews.

Mayor's LAUSD Takeover Bid Declared Unconstitutional Again

A three-judge panel said Tuesday that Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's LAUSD governance plan violates California's constitutional separation of city and school governments.

Pass Rate for Exit Exam on the Rise

California's Superintendent of Public Instruction said Monday almost half of the high school seniors who failed last year's California exit exam are still trying to pass the test. Most enrolled in a fifth year of high school, while others signed up for adult classes.

L.A. School Board Does About Face on Charter Schools Proposal

The Los Angeles Unified Board of Education has reversed itself and will allow a charter school company to run one of the district's lowest-performing schools.

L.A. Philharmonic's Music Director to Step Down

Esa-Pekka Salonen will give up his role as music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic in two years. He's passing the baton to Gustavo Dudamel, a 26-year old Venezuelan conductor.

USC Financial Aid Dean Under Investigati

The University of Southern California is one of several schools investigating financial aid practices after New York's Attorney General alleged that officials profited from a loan company the university recommends to students. USC, Columbia University, and the University of Texas placed financial aid officials on leave Thursday after information surfaced that they held stock in the suspect company.

Charter School Founder Claims Success; Critics See Flaws

Green Dot founder Steve Barr is planning a major expansion of charter schools in Los Angeles. Barr says the success of Green Dot's charter schools show his approach works, but some education researchers aren't so sure the model can be expanded.

CSU Faculty Vote to Strike

The stage is set for professors at the 23 California State University campuses to go on strike. CSU faculty and administrators have until Sunday to decide whether to agree to a contract recommended by independent mediators.

Annual California Bilingual Education Conference in Long Beach Rallies Instructors

Although California voters dismantled the state's extensive bilingual education program in the 1990s, bilingual instruction didn't disappear. Some parent and school district-initiated programs remain. Thousands of bilingual educators continue to gather in search of better ways to serve English learners in public schools. The annual conference, organized by the California Association for Bilingual Education, takes place in Long Beach this weekend.

CSU Faculty Voting on Strike Authorization

The California State University is embroiled in a bitter fight between its professors' union and administrators. They've faced each other at the negotiating table for almost two years, but haven't been able to work out a contract for the union's 23,000 members. Pay is an issue, but so is the more subjective matter of respect.