Adrian Florido Community Health Reporter

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Adrian Florido is KPCC's Community Health Reporter.

Prior to joining KPCC, Adrian worked as a reporter for the Fronteras Desk at public radio station KPBS in San Diego, where he covered the U.S.-Mexico border, immigrant and tribal communities, demographics, and culture.

Before that Adrian worked as a staff writer at Voice of San Diego, where he reported on San Diego neighborhoods, immigrant and under-served communities, as well as development, planning, land use and transportation. For a year, he delivered a weekly television segment on NBC San Diego.

Adrian is a Southern California native who earned an undergraduate degree at the University of Chicago. He majored in history with an emphasis on the U.S. and Latin America. In college he was news editor at the student paper, the Chicago Maroon, and also spent time reporting from Capitol Hill and working with the advocacy group Reporters Without Borders.

When he's not reporting, he's out running, seeking out good coffee or listening to good music. He has a special affinity for Son Jarocho, a traditional music from the Mexican state of Veracruz. He travels there as often as possible to learn from old-time musicians.


Stories by Adrian Florido

Blood tests for Exide neighbors still more than 2 weeks off

Los Angeles County was supposed to offer free tests by last fall. A county official says planning took much longer than expected.

14 of California's 32 measles cases intentionally unvaccinated

Public health officials say the anti-vaccination movement could spark a resurgence of the respiratory disease.

Surge in measles cases continues: California now has 32 in 2014

Measles was technically eliminated in the US in 2000, but people who travel abroad can still contract and spread the disease - as can those who do not get vaccinated.

Covered California: Signups picking up as deadline nears

The pace of enrollment is picking up as the March 31 deadline nears. Covered California's chief says there's 'a lot of work to do' before March 31 deadline.

After 5 months, still no blood tests for neighbors of Exide

County health officials had planned to begin offering blood lead level screenings to neighbors of the battery recycling plant months ago. The tests have yet to begin.

East LA families worry about lead from Exide plant; how to get tested

Elevated lead in soil at a local preschool and homes worries local communities. State officials don't require lead testing at child care sites. Find out how to get tested here.

LA County unhappy about changes to black infant health program

The state revised the program to make it more effective. L.A. County says the new approach means it will be able to serve roughly half as many women.

Flu deaths still rising, but at a slower pace

Health officials hope the declining number of deaths means the especially severe flu season is easing up.

Survey highlights stores' marketing of tobacco and alcohol to kids

A statewide survey finds that 7 out of 10 stores have outdoor advertising for alcohol, tobacco products, and junk food. A number are near schools.

Why do black infants die so much more often than white infants?

The elevated rate of infant mortality for black babies has been well documented but poorly understood. Researchers are developing new theories.

LA artists bring health messages to Metro buses

The short videos by six local artists offer their takes on obesity, mental health, lead, and more.They will air on Metro buses through March.

Lara introduces health care bill for undocumented immigrants

State Senator Ricardo Lara says he still does not know how his bill would be funded, or how much it would cost taxpayers.

New state Senate bill would seek health aid for undocumented

State Senator Ricardo Lara plans to introduce a bill that would use state money to make Medi-Cal and private health insurance subsidies available to undocumented immigrants.

Restoration of Medi-Cal dental coverage comes too late for many

As the state prepares to restore dental coverage for poor adults this spring, dentists say many have suffered major dental problems in the years that they went without coverage.

Union launches effort to cap hospital pricing

United Healthcare Workers West wants to limit what hospitals can charge for services to 25 percent above actual cost.