Darby Maloney Arts & Entertainment Editor, The Frame

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Darby C. Maloney is the Arts & Entertainment Editor for Southern California Public Radio. She works on KPCC's daily arts and entertainment program, The Frame.

Prior to joining KPCC, Darby covered the entertainment industry as producer of KCRW’s "The Business" and the "Hollywood Breakdown." While at KCRW, she launched "The Spin-off," a monthly podcast about television, contributed to other culture shows such as "Unfictional," and her work on "The Business" earned numerous awards including two Gracies, a Golden Mike, and a National Entertainment Journalism Award.

In 2006-2007 she was a contributing producer to the "This American Life" television series on Showtime. In the episode "Growth Spurt," she produced the story "Lights, Camera, Traction" about a group of people at the Burbank Senior Artists Colony who made a short film and in the process discovered what it means to be young. From 2008-2010 she helped launch and produce the web-series "The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers" with NOVA and WGBH. The series was nominated for a Webby and won a Streamy in that time.

Prior to her career in producing, Darby was a psychotherapist who was trained in psychoanalysis. She has a BA in English from Northwestern University and a Masters in Social Work from Boston University.


Stories by Darby Maloney

Capturing Nina Simone’s passions and demons in ‘What Happened, Miss Simone?’

“What Happened, Miss Simone?” is a documentary by Liz Garbus that looks at Nina Simone's civil rights efforts, passions and inner demons.

One of James Horner's final collaborators pays tribute to the composer

Patricia Riggen directed "The 33," one of the last films the iconic composer worked on, and she remembers what made him such a special collaborator.

Dolphin's of Hollywood: Story of a landmark record store hits the stage

Dolphin's was one of L.A.'s first African-American-owned record stores, founded by the innovator John Dolphin. A hit stage musical tells the story.

'True Detective' main titles show California's dark, gothic edge

Patrick Clair, the mind behind the main title sequences for both seasons of "True Detective," breaks down how he moved the visuals from Louisiana to the Golden State.

'Dope' combines Inglewood, hip-hop and John Hughes movies

Rick Famuyiwa's "Dope" follows Malcolm, a kid from Inglewood, on an L.A. adventure. "I think film needs to start reflecting [diversity], or it's going to become a dinosaur."

'Me and Earl and the Dying Girl': How the director dealt with personal loss

When we first met the director at Sundance, he’d just completed the movie and we were one of his first interviews. The film's dedicated to his father, and he let us know what that meant.

'The Wolfpack' follows isolated brothers with a film obsession

Director Crystal Moselle documents the brothers whose obsessive relationship with films connects them to the outside world in a story that's almost impossible to believe.

LA Film Festival: Finding its voice by focusing on women and LA

If you want to see the latest movies made outside the studio system, you head to Sundance. The Los Angeles Film Festival remains one that's yet to be fully defined.

Why 'Veep' is moving to LA to depict DC

An expanded California tax credit looks to be bringing shows like "Veep" and "American Horror Story" to L.A. The state Film Commission's Amy Lemisch breaks it down.

Why female A-list stars have romantic interests who are decades older

Young A-list female stars like Emma Stone and Jennifer Lawrence are part of a trend pushing out actresses in their thirties and presenting unrealistic relationships.

Ed Moses says he doesn't make 'art' — he makes 'magic'

Ed Moses hates the words "make" and "create" and "art." As far as he's concerned he's a "shaman" who engages in "magic."

Philip Glass explains how he scores films and continues creating at 78

"Creativity is anytime we take the world and, with our own hands, we make a change in it," Glass says. He continues to work hard, as always — he had day jobs until he was 42.

How Hollywood can change to give women greater opportunity

In part one of our conversation with women filmmakers we discussed specific instances of gender bias the women faced. Now we talk possible solutions.

Top women filmmakers reveal stories of gender bias in Hollywood

While the women-directed "Pitch Perfect 2" and "Fifty Shades of Grey" are hits, we talk with the women behind movies like "Twilight" and "Crash" about facing bias even after success.

Upfronts: Colbert selfies, Supergirl rules and Miley Cyrus in pasties

Stephen Colbert wowed crowds, "Supergirl" looks great, people don't know what NBC is thinking with its Dolly Parton movie series and Miley Cyrus played Johnny Cash in pasties.