Darby Maloney Arts & Entertainment Editor, The Frame

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Darby C. Maloney is the Arts & Entertainment Editor for Southern California Public Radio. She works on KPCC's daily arts and entertainment program, The Frame.

Prior to joining KPCC, Darby covered the entertainment industry as producer of KCRW’s "The Business" and the "Hollywood Breakdown." While at KCRW, she launched "The Spin-off," a monthly podcast about television, contributed to other culture shows such as "Unfictional," and her work on "The Business" earned numerous awards including two Gracies, a Golden Mike, and a National Entertainment Journalism Award.

In 2006-2007 she was a contributing producer to the "This American Life" television series on Showtime. In the episode "Growth Spurt," she produced the story "Lights, Camera, Traction" about a group of people at the Burbank Senior Artists Colony who made a short film and in the process discovered what it means to be young. From 2008-2010 she helped launch and produce the web-series "The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers" with NOVA and WGBH. The series was nominated for a Webby and won a Streamy in that time.

Prior to her career in producing, Darby was a psychotherapist who was trained in psychoanalysis. She has a BA in English from Northwestern University and a Masters in Social Work from Boston University.


Stories by Darby Maloney

Why Gary Ross quit 'The Hunger Games' to do 'Free State of Jones'

The filmmaker approached making the movie the way a graduate student might take on a dissertation — through years and years of research and studying.

Jim Henson's daughter expands on his creative legacy, on- and off-camera

Under the leadership of Lisa Henson, the Jim Henson Company has moved to diversify its staff and advance its use of technology. She even plans a virtual reality project using a script by her father from the 1960s.

Did Led Zeppelin rip off 'Stairway to Heaven'?

Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” is consider by some to be the greatest song of the classic rock era. Was its signature intro stolen from another band?

How the director of 'The Fits' made a quiet movie that says a lot

For her movie about a young girl’s coming of age, Anna Rose Holmer cast a girls dance troupe whose members had never acted in a movie.

George C. Wolfe's 'Shuffle Along' and the musical that 'electrified' 1920s New York

“Shuffle Along” was a massive commercial success in the 1920s, but the musical and its origins have been largely lost to Broadway history. Until now.

Comedian Quincy Jones: 'There is no cancer when I'm on that stage'

The 31-year-old comedian received a stage 4 cancer diagnosis last year. A successful Kickstarter campaign will make possible the taping of a stand-up special so he has something to leave behind.

What made Bryan Cranston go from police work to acting? Girls.

In his life after “Breaking Bad,” Bryan Cranston is busier than ever. He reflects on a life in acting, what he learned from his dad's acting career and how he advi

Aziz Ansari brings 'genuine' diversity to 'Master of None'

"Master of None" co-creators Aziz Ansari and Alan Yang aren't thrilled with Hollywood's tendency to cast straight, white male leading roles.

Director Susanne Bier: 'Night Manager' was 'one of the most satisfying things I've done'

The Academy Award-winning director explains why the adaptation of John le Carré's novel needed to be a miniseries instead of a feature film.

Hello, Spotify! Goodbye, songwriters?

Songwriters are singing the blues over the paltry sums paid them by streaming services. But veteran songwriters Michelle Lewis and Kay Hanley are leading a fight for more fair compensation.

'It was terrifying' —Lee Daniels, others give their take on upfronts

Amidst all the talk of ratings and demographics at upfronts, there are the actors and show creators who help sell their shows to advertisers. These are some of those people.

'The Lobster' is a darkly comedic look at a society that harshly penalizes single people

“The Lobster” is clearly a dystopian satire and a dark comedy, even if the characters in the film aren’t laughing about their predicaments.

Trump is more Schwarzenegger than Al Franken on campaign trail

Trump forged a celebrity character on "The Apprentice," and the way he's using it on the campaign trail is strikingly similar to what Schwarzenegger did with his "Terminator" character.

Chadwick Boseman: from Jackie Robinson to James Brown to Black Panther

The actor has quickly made a name for himself in Hollywood. The next step: getting cast roles that aren't defined by race.

Louie Anderson channels his mom's humanity in 'Baskets'

The veteran comedian plays Christine Baskets, the mother of identical twins played by Zach Galifianakis, on the FX show, "Baskets."