Dorian Merina Reporter/ Producer, Take Two

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Contact Dorian Merina

Dorian Merina is Reporter/ Producer for KPCC's Take Two show.

Dorian is an L.A. native but he’s lived and reported from many places, including New York, Manila and Jakarta. A former teacher and artist (he still writes poetry!), Dorian started in journalism in 2006, writing for a variety of publications. He then went on to get his masters at the Columbia School of Journalism while working at WNYC, producing show segments and reporting.

More recently, he served as an anchor and producer for the Free Speech Radio News, but took a break from there in 2010 to be a Fulbright Scholar in the Philippines. He relied on archival research and field recording to document indigenous oral poetry, called Laji, on the Batanes Islands there.

As many of his former colleagues have noted, Dorian has an ability to detect and report on those people and places that do not get a lot of coverage in the news. He speaks both Spanish and Tagalog and is a self-proclaimed soccer nut.


Stories by Dorian Merina

Obama's actions could affect thousands at LA's immigration courts

A former immigration judge says if the president's order is properly enforced by the Department of Homeland Security it could mean a "moderately significant, if not a very significant" decrease in the number of cases that are brought by the government.

Luis Rodriguez, poet laureate of LA, takes on his beloved, resilient city

Los Angeles is a city filled with wordsmiths. But only one of them holds the title of poet laureate, Luis J. Rodriguez.

Veterans reflect on a forgotten alliance: Filipinos and Americans in WWII

More than 250,000 Filipinos fought alongside US soldiers during World War II. Only a fraction have received the recognition that they say was promised to them.

At LA's immigration courts, youth face critical steps with or without an attorney

Some children are the first to enter the immigration court system under a new, expedited program that requires them to have a court hearing within 21 days of their initial filing.

Could a smaller, lighter soccer ball reduce the risk of injury?

A new soccer ball, called the Eir ball, is smaller and lighter, aiming to reduce injuries in youth soccer. Will it help?

'Who We Be' explores race and culture in America's recent past

Author and cultural critic Jeff Chang looks at how pop art, TV commercials and political campaigns have deeply shaped how we talk about race today.

US soccer's Christen Press: 'Being in the moment' key to World Cup

Wednesday night, the U.S. women's soccer squad begins its World Cup campaign as it faces off against Trinidad and Tobago.

Ferguson residents seek dialogue, change ahead of planned protests

Two voices – one black, one white – weigh in on police reform, dialogue and the ongoing investigation into Michael Brown's death.

Film series seeks to change perspective of Africa

Surfing. Street art. Hip hop. Topics not typically part of the news that comes from Africa, but that's the point of a new series of short films part of a project called My Africa Is.

Nation's estuaries form vital, and vulnerable, coastal wetlands

This week, scientists and coastal residents across the United States are drawing attention to the importance of local waterways, called estuaries.

New community college chancellor pledges higher completion rates, shorter grad times

The Los Angeles Community College District is the largest in the nation with its fair share of problems, but Chancellor Francisco Rodriguez is optimistic.

Understaffed immigration judges face rise of migrant cases

The nation's immigration courts face an unprecedented backlog of cases. Much of that strain falls on the judges, who ultimately decide who can stay and who cannot.

LA's immigration courts overwhelmed by child migrant cases

L.A. courts more than 46,000 cases the L.A. courts are currently dealing with. L.A. has the largest share of pending immigration cases, making it the busiest jurisdiction in the country.

The Getty brings street art to El Segundo

What do LA's top graffiti artists have in common with a rare, 17th-century text found in the Getty's rare book collection? As it turns out, plenty.

Gaza couple live streams sights and sounds of city under seige

Photojournalist Lara Aburamadan and her husband, Jehad, have been live-streaming the view from their 11th floor apartment for the world to see.