Frank Stoltze Correspondent

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Contact Frank Stoltze

Frank Stoltze is an award-winning correspondent who currently covers criminal justice and public safety issues for KPCC.

Frank reports on racial bias, community policing, gangs, the use of force, technology, and generally what works and what doesn’t at law enforcement agencies in the region.

Over more than two decades in Southern California, Frank has covered L.A. City Hall, national political conventions and all manner of breaking news – from the Rodney King riots to wildfires, earthquakes and the death of Michael Jackson. His awards include Golden Mikes for coverage of Skid Row and a documentary on the historic recall of California Governor Gray Davis.

Frank was named a Distinguished Journalist by the L.A. Society of Professional Journalists and was twice awarded Radio Journalist of the Year by the L.A. Press Club. He was a Guggenheim Fellow at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Center on Media, Crime and Justice and USC’s Annenberg Institute for Justice and Journalism.

After graduating from Southern Methodist University, Frank first reported for radio in San Luis Obispo, covering the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. He is a contributor to NPR, the BBC, The Takeaway and The California Report. Frank is based at KPCC’s downtown bureau, a stone's throw from Central Market tortas.


Stories by Frank Stoltze

Feds say LA youth probation camps in 'compliance' with reforms

A confidential letter obtained by KPCC said L.A.'s youth probation camps have implemented a series of reforms. "But there are still a lot of hurdles," says one county official.

Elections 2015: LA voters approve charter amendments, city council newbies

Two measures that would shift the timing of local elections received more than 76 percent voter approval on Tuesday night.

Skid Row police shooting update: shooting will be early test of body camera policy

Three officers, one of whom is a sergeant, shot a man as they struggled on the ground for control of one of the officer's weapons, after a stun gun proved ineffective, police said.

Election 2015: LA city measures aimed at boosting voter turnout

Under Charter Amendments 1 and 2, Los Angeles city elections would shift to even-numbered years, to coincide with state and national elections.

Election 2015: Offering hope and help for South LA

Four candidates are vying to replace L.A. City Councilman Bernard Parks, who has represented the area for 12 years. All agree the area needs economic investment.

Coroner: LAPD officers contributed to Omar Abrego’s death

The death of Omar Abrego - and that of Ezell Ford a week later and just a few blocks away - sparked angry protests outside LAPD headquarters.

The split over subpoena power for LA Sheriff oversight

Organizing group is split on subpoena power for the LA Sheriff's oversight commission. The sheriff and the deputies' union oppose it. State law complicates it.

$1.5M settlement for man slain by LA deputy

County Board of Supervisors agrees to pay $1.5 million to the family of a man slain by LA deputy in 2012. The deputy was accused of planting a gun in another case.

Can a new LAPD captain win over the citizens of South LA?

Two unarmed men died in the last year during stops by officers from LAPD's Newton Division. The chief has sent a new captain. Can one man make a difference?

LA Deputy Mayor Eileen Decker named US Attorney

Eileen Decker will lead one of the largest U.S. Attorneys offices in the country. She will become one of the nation's top federal prosecutors.

Parents get $800K after county workers remove their children

Amid increased scrutiny of how L.A. County handles child abuse cases, the Board of Supervisors agrees to settle a federal civil rights lawsuit brought by two parents.

Ezell Ford case: LAPD officer had history in neighborhood

LAPD Officer Sharlton Wampler has patrolled the neighborhoods of South LA since at least 2008. He and another officer fatally shot the unarmed Ezell Ford in August.

What happens to those named in LAPD 'suspicious activity reports'?

The LAPD's SAR program is a national model for reporting suspicious activity related to terrorism. But critics say it sweeps up innocent people.

LAPD had 35 suspected ‘suicide by cop’ incidents in 30 months

The LAPD Inspector General reviewed a series of shootings over a 30 month period and identified common characteristics in apparent suicide-by-cop cases.

Mayor: Increasing LAFD diversity won’t threaten service

A study commissioned by the mayor is critical of the Los Angeles Fire Department's recruiting process. The agency is half white and nearly entirely male.