John Horn

Host, The Frame

Contact John Horn

John Horn is the host of KPCC’s The Frame, a daily arts and entertainment program.

John has been covering arts and entertainment in Southern California for nearly 30 years. At the Los Angeles Times, he was a lead writer on the film industry for more than a decade, taking readers behind the scenes to examine the creative process and explain how Hollywood works, and why. In 2013, he traveled to the former plantation where “12 Years a Slave” was filmed with director Steve McQueen, and more recently charted how the story of Columbine came to a stage in New York and watched Angelina Jolie take on her first big studio directing job, the "Unbroken” story of Olympian and USC alumnus Louis Zamperini.

Before joining the Times, John was a senior writer at Newsweek magazine, a senior editor at Premiere magazine, an entertainment reporter for The Associated Press, and covered the television industry for the Orange County Register. John’s interest in the arts extends beyond film and he served on the board of directors of The National Arts Journalism Program, where he was a fellow in the mid-1990s.

John was a regular contributor to “The Business” on KCRW, where he also regularly co-hosted on-air segments and podcasts on entertainment news. Prior to joining KPCC, John was a guest on Take Two and AirTalk, including a memorable appearance in 2012 on the morning of the theater shootings in Aurora, Colo. Thanks in part to John’s contribution, that day’s program won a Golden Mike award for best live coverage of a news story from the RTNA of Southern California.

Stories by John Horn

'War Machine' uses satire to cast a critical eye on the war in Afghanistan

What does a war movie look like in the Trump Era? One of the first is “War Machine” from Australian writer/director David Michod.

Netflix's 'The Get Down': Baz Luhrmann wasn't returning either way

Before Netflix announced there would be no second season of the ambitious and expensive series, the filmmaker said he would bow out.

Grateful Dead doc director says 'Long Strange Trip' isn't just for Deadheads

The documentary examines how The Grateful Dead found its sound and community, and made the charismatic Jerry Garcia a reluctant leader.

Manchester: Why music matters to girls and why girls matter to music

Following the Manchester bombing, NPR music critic Ann Powers wrote, "Young girls loving music, whatever kind of music, are truth. I believe in them and nothing can annihilate their truth."

Making the Netflix crime series 'The Keepers' was 'sickening' for filmmaker Ryan White

The documentary investigates a mysterious murder, but then finds a bigger story about sexual abuse and the power of the Catholic Church in Maryland.

‘Black Mirror’ creator: 'It’s a giddy time to be alive'

Charlie Brooker and his co-executive producer, Annabel Jones, talk about their dark sci-fi series that's been likened to a modern-day "Twilight Zone."

The heat is turning up for Fyre Festival with new FBI investigation

The fallout from the ill-fated Fyre Festival continues, with news that the FBI is looking into possible fraud committed by the promoters.

How teaching English in China led 'The Wall' screenwriter to big break

Dwain Worrell was teaching English in China when he submitted a screenplay through Amazon's open submission site. Weeks later he was headed back to the US with a movie deal in hand.

What 'Actually' is sexual assault? A new play explores the question of consent

Anna Ziegler's play "Actually" delves deeply into the murky territory that often surrounds the he-said, she-said accounts of a reported sexual assault.

Did Conan O'Brien steal a joke about 'shrinkage'? It may be up to a jury to decide

Tom Brady and a Washington Monument penis joke figure prominently in a joke theft accusation that may land Conan O'Brien in court.

Summer 2017 movies: Beyond 'Pirates,' 'Apes,' and 'Transformers'

The 2017 summer movie season will be dominated by sequels, but there are also plenty of promising original films to watch out for too.

John Oliver reprises his role in the revived net neutrality debate

In 2014, Oliver rallied his viewers to contact the Federal Communications Commission in support of net neutrality. With the new FCC head looking to roll back regulations, Oliver is back at it.

'BANG: The Bert Berns Story': Uncovering the legacy of a legendary R&B producer

Brett Berns makes a documentary about his dad — an influential producer who shaped the sound of pop and R&B in the '60s when the music industry resembled the Wild West.

'Dear White People' creator Justin Simien on popping the 'post-racial bubble'

The new Netflix series uses satirical, self-referential comedy to address touchy topics like race, politics and sexuality.

Roger Guenveur Smith's one-man show takes a closer look at Rodney King's life and legacy

With his fiery play titled simply “Rodney King,” actor and playwright Roger Guenveur Smith places the beating of Rodney King in a broader cultural context.