John Rabe Host, Off-Ramp

Contact John Rabe

John Rabe is the creator and host of Off-Ramp, KPCC's weekend news and arts magazine program, which has twice been named "best local public affairs show."

Prior to his time on Off-Ramp, Rabe was KPCC's host for "All Things Considered" and the station's housing & healthcare reporter, but Off-Ramp lets him do what he loves best, and emulate one of his heroes, the late Huell Howser.

Rabe began his career as a commercial DJ in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, then found his niche as reporter and anchor at WKAR, Michigan State University's public radio station, where he earned his BA in English.

Rabe has also worked in public radio in South Florida, at WHYY in Philadelphia, and Minnesota Public Radio. He came to KPCC in 2000. Off-Ramp debuted in 2006.

He lives with his art curator husband, Julian Bermudez, and Irish terriers in the foothills of Mt Washington.


Stories by John Rabe

MythBuster live show turns learning science into 'Brain Candy'

"Brain Candy" is "a little like a science lesson if you gathered Eisenstein and Walt Disney together. It’s Blue Man Group meets the TED Talk."

RIP Donna Fuller, 85: What a voice, and what a life!

85-year old jazz and pop contralto Donna Fuller died Tuesday. She performed in Playboy Jazz clubs, toured with Christine Jorgensen, was A-list adjacent, and made two really good albums you should listen to.

George Takei's almost 80 years celebrated at the Japanese American National Museum

On the occasion of "'New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei," a new exhibit at the Japanese American National Museum that opens Sunday, I had to speak with George Takei himself about his long life and career.

Exclusive first look at JANM's 'New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei'

The Japanese American National Museum backed up a couple of trucks to George Takei's house, accepting the donation of his vast personal archive. The new exhibit — "New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei" — opens Sunday.

'To Be Takei' director Jennifer Kroot says George does it for his dad

"Seeing what his father went through... he doesn't take that lightly... That's behind everything he does."

Samurai Jack is back, so we go in-depth with animator Genndy Tartakovsky

A noble, handsome warrior trying to save the world and get back home. An ugly evil demon who thwarts him every time. This was the simple premise of "Samurai Jack," which ran four seasons on Cartoon Network starting in 2001, and returns for one more season this weekend.

Will we be riding Angels Flight by Labor Day?

Wednesday, LA city officials announced a public-private partnership to have downtown's historic Angels Flight railway back in operation by Labor Day, once again hauling riders up and down Bunker Hill.

'Missing Richard Simmons' podcast seeks disappeared fitness magnate

Almost exactly three years ago, Richard Simmons, once the most accessible celebrity in Los Angeles, withdrew from public life. Only a few people have heard from him since, not including podcast host Dan Taberski.

Skid Row dilemma: Is it wrong to use sprinklers to keep the homeless away?

The city won't keep the sidewalks clear and clean, and you're trying to run a business. And you're not a hipster boutique that just parachuted into Skid Row a few years ago. We've got a dilemma for you.

James Kim's new podcast 'The Competition' explores wild world of Van Cliburn contestants

It was kinda fun turning the tables on James Kim -- who is secretly competitive -- while asking him about his new podcast, which goes deep on competitions and highly competitive people.

The too-short career of installation artist and farmboy Jason Rhoades

What might you find in a Jason Rhoades installation? Bongs, a stuffed snake riding an electric train, an entire room laid out like an Ikea showroom, neon signs spelling out nicknames for the vulva, orange extension cords, restaurant shelving.

Song of the Week: LA Chamber Orchestra, Kodaly, and coffee

The people who brought you the giant inflatable rabbits and the giant musicians along the 110 bring you a coffee break Wednesday with two veteran string players from the LA Chamber Orchestra.

Song of the Week: Crying, in the rain, because Willie Nelson's Bako concerts are sold out?

Nelson wrote many great songs but "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain," a breakout hit for the singer, was written by Fred Rose back in 1947, and was first performed by Roy Acuff. It was allegedly the last song Elvis ever sang.

Simpsons' Dan Castellaneta writes, stars in play about Oscar Levant

The voice of Homer Simpson, Dan Castellaneta, is bringing a a celebrity who died in 1972 back to life in the new play "For Piano and Harpo." Who? "It's Oscar Levant, you musical ignoramus!"

Off-Ramp's Song of the Week salutes songwriter Mac Davis on his 75th birthday

Usually, Off-Ramp's Song of the Week features a local act, or a national act playing a cool local gig. But this time, we want to help a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame blow out the 75 candles on his cake.