Kitty Felde Washington, D.C. Correspondent

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Kitty Felde is KPCC's Washington, D.C. Correspondent.

Before moving to the nation's capital, Kitty hosted KPCC's "Talk of the City" from 1997-2006.

In addition to her work in Los Angeles, Felde has reported from Africa and The Hague on AIDS and the war crimes tribunals for Rwanda and Bosnia.

When Felde puts down her microphone, she puts on her pointed shoes in ballet class. She's also an award-winning playwright. Her work has been produced at the National Theater in Washington, D.C., and at various theaters in New York and Los Angeles. If you look very closely in Woody Allen's "Radio Days," you'll spot her playing the role of Mrs. Riley.


Stories by Kitty Felde

Secure Communities controversy: Immigration officals say they'll address program's pitfalls

Federal immigration officials are taking steps to address recent controversy over the Secure Communities program which uses fingerprints to identify undocumented immigrants behind bars, but immigrant rights activists say the agency needs to do much more.

Villaraigosa applauds Brown’s California state budget veto, says budget relied on 'gimmicks'

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa applauded the governor's state budget veto today.

Villaraigosa to be sworn in as head of US Conference of Mayors

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villariagosa will be sworn in Monday as the new president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Chicago's new mayor minds political P's and Q's

LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is poised to become the new president of the US Conference of Mayors. But there was a potential cloud over his inauguration weekend: the new mayor of Chicago, former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel.

Ten thousand mistakes on Capitol Hill

You don't have to be an amateur on Twitter to make a mistake on Capitol Hill. You don't even have to be a member of Congress. There are pitfalls aplenty if you work in Washington.

Californians testify about threat of Muslim radicals in prison

A pair of terrorism experts from Southern California testified on Capitol Hill this morning about the threat of Muslim-American radicalization behind bars.

Armenian Genocide resolution introduced again

A Southland congressman has once again introduced a resolution that calls on the United States to formally recognize the Armenian Genocide. A bipartisan group of lawmakers has introduced a companion resolution.

California House Democrats oppose water bill that favors Central Valley farmers

House Democrats from California are attacking a water bill that favors some farmers in the Central Valley. They called their own witnesses to testify against a bill by Republican Congressman Devin Nunes of Tulare.

Opting out of Secure Communities: Law, technology make it tough to not enforce controversial immigrant-focused program

Under a new federal program called Secure Communities, the fingerprints of anyone arrested are shared with immigration officials. The aim is to find criminals in the country illegally and deport them. But immigrant rights advocates say the program also deports people who aren’t criminals, but were just unlucky enough to get swept up by the cops. Now some law enforcement agencies, counties and even three states want out of Secure Communities.

Secure Communities: California sheriffs split over illegal immigration deportation program

Over the past few months, sheriffs in California have begun participating in a federal program known as Secure Communities. It requires them to share jail inmate fingerprints with immigration officials. Anyone in the country illegally is targeted for deportation. Sheriffs in Southern California support Secure Communities, but not the sheriff of San Francisco. In the second report in a two-part series, we examine the split.

Secure Communities: Controversy rages over how deportation program affects public safety

Last week, New York joined Illinois by announcing it has pulled out of the immigration enforcement program known as Secure Communities. In California, the state legislature is considering whether to let counties to do the same. Secure Communities was supposed to sweep up criminal illegal immigrants, not stir up controversy. In the first of three-part series, we examine the program’s history and mechanics.

They may be dancing at the Jefferson Memorial, but the real protest is across the street from Georgetown Law School

There's been lots of publicity about the flashmob dance protest at the Jefferson Memorial. People gathering to fight for their right to act silly in a public space. But there was another protest Saturday, no dancing, just speeches in Chinese, and torches, commemorating a more somber occasion: the anniversary of the protests at Tiananmen Square.

After White House meeting, GOP and Democrats still at impasse over debt ceiling

President Barack Obama invited House Republicans to his house Wednesday morning to talk about spending cuts and the debt ceiling. It appears the meeting did little to mend the gap between the GOP and Democrats.

Feds say it's not easy for California to opt out of Secure Communities fingerprints plan

The state Assembly has voted to stop cooperating with federal immigration officials. But it’s not that easy for states to opt out of the federal Secure Communities program.

Obama nominates former Edison International CEO John Bryson to be Commerce secretary

President Obama has nominated John Bryson to be the next federal Commerce secretary. Bryson is the former chief executive of Edison International, the parent company of Southern California Edison.