Kitty Felde Washington, D.C. Correspondent

Staff Photos
Contact Kitty Felde

Kitty Felde is KPCC's Washington, D.C. Correspondent.

Before moving to the nation's capital, Kitty hosted KPCC's "Talk of the City" from 1997-2006.

In addition to her work in Los Angeles, Felde has reported from Africa and The Hague on AIDS and the war crimes tribunals for Rwanda and Bosnia.

When Felde puts down her microphone, she puts on her pointed shoes in ballet class. She's also an award-winning playwright. Her work has been produced at the National Theater in Washington, D.C., and at various theaters in New York and Los Angeles. If you look very closely in Woody Allen's "Radio Days," you'll spot her playing the role of Mrs. Riley.


Stories by Kitty Felde

Congressional hearing on 'radicalization' of American Muslims draws criticism

The House Homeland Security Committee holds a hearing this week on “the extent of radicalization” in the American Muslim community. One California Republican says the hearing will take a balanced view of an important subject. But some California Democrats worry that the hearing will rev up religious intolerance.

McKeon says Obama doing nothing on Libya

The comment came at the end of a press conference announcing a bill that would block funding for any detainee facility in the continental United States. Reporters working on other stories often hang around till the end, hoping to get a quote they can drop in their own story.

EPA gives OK to California ban on dry cleaning chemical

The federal Environmental Protection Agency has given the green light to California’s ban on a chemical many dry cleaners use.

House says 'no' to 1099 filing requirement

The US House of Representatives has voted to repeal a provision of the health care law small business owners hated.

Styrofoam and plastic back on Capitol Hill

Foam coffee cups and plastic utensils are back on Capitol Hill. Former US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s “greening the Capitol” campaign has gone the way of the Democratic supermajority.

Congressman Schiff decries violence in Pakistan

This week, gunmen assassinated a Pakistani cabinet minister. It was the second killing of a Pakistani moderate in two months. A California congressman calls these developments "deeply discouraging."

Jelly beans and rubber band wars on Capitol Hill

Members of Congress are pretty busy people, so I spend a lot of time waiting around in reception areas. Last night, I stumbled upon two odd facts:

Gas industry official calls San Bruno blast 'an anomaly'

A natural gas industry official labeled last fall’s deadly San Bruno pipeline blast as “an anomaly.” Members of the National Transportation Safety Board challenged that assessment.

NTSB hearing on San Bruno pipeline blast: no silver bullet for detecting pipeline problems

The National Transportation Safety Board is wrapping up its three days of hearings examining the pipeline rupture and explosion in San Bruno. Today's focus is on technology - both remote shut off valves, but also on ways to detect problems in underground pipes.

San Bruno explosion called anomaly by gas industry

An American Gas Association vice president called the natural gas pipeline explosion "an anomaly" because it appears its cause was a manufacturing defect in the pipe. National Transportation Safety Board investigator Robert Trainor questioned that conclusion, pointing out that ten people have died in two recent accidents that appear to be caused by faulty pipes.

NTSB hearing on San Bruno pipeline explosion: day 3

The topic for today's National Transportation Safety Board is technology. How do you find flaws in underground pipelines?

NTSB hearing on San Bruno pipeline highlights cost of replacing old pipes

How much will it cost to replace the nation's aging pipes and valves? Linda Daugherty of the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration told the National Transportation Safety Board that replacing just half the nation's valves alone could cost 600 milllion dollars.

NTSB hearing on San Bruno blast: lots of old pipes nationwide

Six out of ten underground pipes in America were installed before 1970. That's according to Paul Metro, Vice Chair of the National Association of Pipeline Safety Representatives. Metro told the National Transportation Safety Board that he's concerned about the lack of information about these older pipes.

Where's the pipeline in your neighborhood?

One of the National Transportation Safety Board officials admitted he didn't know whether there were pipelines under his house. The fire chief of San Bruno said he didn't know there was a major transmission pipeline under his city.

Is there a pipeline in your neighborhood?

One of the National Transportation Safety Board officials admitted he didn't know whether there were pipelines under his house. The fire chief of San Bruno said he didn't know there was a major transmission pipeline under his city.