Kyle Stokes Education Reporter

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Contact Kyle Stokes

Kyle Stokes is the K-12 reporter on Southern California Public Radio's education team.

Kyle previously worked at KPLU Public Radio in Seattle where he covered education, including a major teachers strike. He also authored a documentary, "Renaissance Beach," on efforts to turn around a long-troubled Seattle high school. Before that, Kyle spent about three years in Bloomington, Indiana, helping launch an education reporting collaboration between NPR and member station WFIU. His work for that project, called StateImpact Indiana, earned honors from PRNDI, ONA and two National Edward R. Murrow Awards from RTDNA.

Kyle earned a Bachelors of Journalism from the University of Missouri. While in Columbia, Mo., he worked as a producer for NPR member station KBIA and a reporter for NBC affiliate KOMU. He graduated in 2011.


Stories by Kyle Stokes

5 things you should know about LAUSD's $7.5B budget

Just think about how much money that is: L.A. Unified spends more than 29 different state governments spend K-12 education — and it's all up for a vote Tuesday.

LAUSD launching ‘one-stop shop’ for parents seeking schools

Superintendent Michelle King's plan to create a "unified enrollment system," a replacement for L.A. Unified's balkanized school choice process, is now moving ahead.

LAUSD board adds two more years to superintendent's contract

The extension comes a full year before Michelle King's contract was set to expire — and less than a month before two L.A. Unified board members step down.

California wants you to teach science or special ed

State lawmakers are considering making an offer to prospective teachers: commit to teach in these high-need subjects and we'll take a bite out of your tuition costs.

Can LAUSD copy a good school? Its teachers doubt it

At a school that L.A. Unified is using as a model for a new magnet program in Watts, teachers question whether the district's plan to "replicate" their success can work.

Charter school discipline, enrollment deal struck in Assembly

A deal in Sacramento between charter school lobbyists and the teachers union could lead to changes to the state's charter school enrollment and discipline laws.

Teachers' contract will be early test for new LAUSD board

United Teachers Los Angeles endorsed their opponents during the campaign, but will now have to work with Nick Melvoin and Kelly Gonez. The first order of business: a new contract.

So LAUSD has a charter-backed school board majority. What now?

Tuesday’s elections shifted the balance of power on the L.A. School Board; a majority of the board will have been endorsed by charter school advocates.

Election night reaps rewards for charter school-backed LAUSD candidates

Following the most expensive campaign for school board L.A. has ever seen, Nick Melvoin ousted incumbent Steve Zimmer in District 4. In the East Valley's District 6, Kelly Gonez bested Imelda Padilla.

Spending on LAUSD race shatters records

Outside groups have spent more than $14 million to influence voters. Smaller sums are being raised to sway decisions on a police oversight measure, the only citywide race.

The politics of LA Unified's graduation rate

Two school board candidates have questioned whether L.A. Unified's graduation rate is "inflated." Could their election alter LAUSD's "100 percent" graduation goal?

2 Celerity charter schools shut down by state education board

Two schools run by Celerity Educational Group — the Los Angeles charter school operator under federal investigation — are shutting down.

LAUSD: Here's what to do if ICE agents come to campus

L.A. Unified board members told school employees not to comply with immigration agents' requests until the district's lawyers get a chance to review them.

District report: LAUSD would lose money on sale of its HQ

Two L.A. Unified School Board members floated the idea in January, even if only as a creative planning exercise. On Tuesday, district staff threw cold water on it.

What to do about the ballooning cost of LAUSD's benefits

With the May 16 run-off elections for two L.A. Unified School Board seats just weeks away, the question of how district leaders ought to handle increasingly expensive benefits costs has surfaced in the campaign debate.