Kyle Stokes Education Reporter

Kyle Stokes headshot
Contact Kyle Stokes

Kyle Stokes is the K-12 reporter on Southern California Public Radio's education team.

Kyle previously worked at KPLU Public Radio in Seattle where he covered education, including a major teachers strike. He also authored a documentary, "Renaissance Beach," on efforts to turn around a long-troubled Seattle high school. Before that, Kyle spent about three years in Bloomington, Indiana, helping launch an education reporting collaboration between NPR and member station WFIU. His work for that project, called StateImpact Indiana, earned honors from PRNDI, ONA and two National Edward R. Murrow Awards from RTDNA.

Kyle earned a Bachelors of Journalism from the University of Missouri. While in Columbia, Mo., he worked as a producer for NPR member station KBIA and a reporter for NBC affiliate KOMU. He graduated in 2011.


Stories by Kyle Stokes

What to do about the ballooning cost of LAUSD's benefits

With the May 16 run-off elections for two L.A. Unified School Board seats just weeks away, the question of how district leaders ought to handle increasingly expensive benefits costs has surfaced in the campaign debate.

LAUSD to pilot an expanded dual-language preschool program

L.A. Unified School Board members approved a pilot program that expands "dual-language immersion" instruction to up to eight preschool classrooms next school year.

LAUSD board backs proposal for stricter charter school laws

L.A. Unified School Board members' 4-3 vote again put them in the middle of the political tug-of-war between teachers union leaders and charter school advocates.

San Bernardino teacher remembered for her faith, voice

"She had … God-given talent" for music and for working with children, said a cousin of Karen Smith, who was killed in her San Bernardino classroom on Monday.

3 dead, 1 wounded after San Bernardino school shooting

A female teacher is dead and two students wounded after a shooting in a classroom at North Park Elementary, in what is believed to be a murder-suicide, officials said.

Long Beach schools face challenge on funding for high-needs kids

The complaint formally accuses Long Beach Unified School District officials of spending state funding intended for high-need students on district-wide expenses.

2 charter schools oversight bills surface in Sacramento

Two bills in Sacramento would apply state open records and open meetings laws, as well as an ethics law, to the few charter schools that don't already follow them.

White parents still live near mostly white schools, study says

White kids in the U.S.'s largest cities continue to have mostly-white neighbors — in large part because their parents want to send them to mostly-white schools.

The long road to college from the high school 'at-risk' list

This at-risk ninth grader made his school's "focus list" and then promised to stop skipping class and boost his grades. What will it take to get him into college?

Here's how LAUSD spends money intended for 'high-need' kids

Per-pupil spending in high schools with high concentrations of needy students is going up. But in elementary and middle schools, spending lags behind.

LA Unified alerts central office staff to possible cuts

L.A. Unified school officials seem serious about slashing the district's central office budget by $86.5 million — a cut of roughly 25 percent.

About that supposed $1 billion-plus LA Unified budget deficit…

By 2018-19, L.A. Unified's budget will be in the red — but, according to new projections, perhaps not as far in the red as an ad from the last election suggested.

What's behind record spending in LA school board primary

The charter schools-versus-teachers union narrative has gotten so familiar in L.A. that it's easy to forget why the battle exists — and why it matters to families.

LA county, city elections deliver low turnout, major changes

In semi-official returns, L.A. County and city voters approve Measure H homeless tax, reject the Measure S development proposal and re-elect Mayor Eric Garcetti.

How to campaign in a wide-open, low-turnout LAUSD board race

It's hard to win historically low-turnout L.A. school board elections. But East Valley candidates face an added challenge: break out of a crowded field.