Leo Duran Producer and Reporter, Take Two

Leo Duran
Contact Leo Duran

Leo Duran is a producer and reporter for KPCC’s Take Two. Leo works to find regular people with extraordinary takes on the day’s news.

Leo came to KPCC in October 2012 from the nationally-syndicated program "The Takeaway," where he performed nearly every single job since its launch except host. Leo helped to develop the show’s fast-paced conversational style and the innovative use of listener-interaction — while not getting a lot of sleep.

Leo got his start in public media as a listener to Wisconsin Public Radio, eventually leading its morning drive-time program, "The Joy Cardin Show."

He’s a University of Wisconsin graduate, an avid biker and baker, and plans to avoid buying a car for as long as he can in L.A.


Stories by Leo Duran

'Tattoo Nation' doc explores body art's journey from taboo to trendy (Photos)

A new documentary explores how tattoos have moved from a sign of rebellion to a trendy fashion statement. Plus, share your tattoo stories with us!

Stealth fees driving up the cost of college

A new report by ProPublica shows that several schools around the country say they're keeping down tuition costs. But at the same time, more and more fees are popping up on bills --- and those might not be part of the official price tag that prospective students look at.

Does God love gay Christians? Writer Jeff Chu's search for an answer

Writer Jeff Chu wanted to know the answer to a pivotal question inspired it the Sunday school song "Jesus Loves Me." As a gay Christian, does Jesus love him?

In 'Ground Operations,' American war vets find new lives in organic farming

Vets returning from Iraq and Afghanistan face a 10 percent unemployment rate when they come home. But Take Two looks at one path to giving them a job: encouraging them to become farmers.

Challenging Latino stereotypes in the media

Picture a strong and positive Latino character in film or TV, and you might think of Edward James Olmos as math teacher Jaime Escalante in 1988's Stand and Deliver.

Tackling Asian stereotypes in film and TV

This Saturday, these images are getting tossed out of the rickshaw they rode in on: the first summit on Asian-American stereotypes takes place at the Japanese American National Museum in LA.

The LA Times resuscitates its latent Homicide Report blog

When it debuted in 2007, the LA Times' blog The Homicide Report was a breakout hit. Reporter Jill Leovy meticulously wrote about every homicide victim in L.A. County. Now the paper is reviving it by looking for a dedicated reporter. Assistant managing editor Megan Garvey explains that it's a difficult job.

Can good grammar get you further in the work world?

One informal study of 100 LinkedIn profiles found that people with fewer grammatical errors had a higher level of professional achievement.

'Being White in Philly' sparks racial debate in the City of Brotherly Love

In the City of Brotherly Love, there's little love for a magazine article that's stirred up race relations. Philadelphia Magazine recently published a cover story, "Being White in Philly."

'Concussion businesses' grow around NFL's increased concern about head injuries

The NFL announced this week it'll spend $60 million to research and develop new technology to prevent future injuries. But there might be millions more to be had by companies that are springing up to offer their own equipment and products to the league.

In the shadow of SXSW, Austin's other fest explores Mexican-American music

Can't get a ticket to one of the hundreds of bands at South by Southwest in Austin, Texas? Well, it's not the only music fest in town. The 3rd annual Mexican-American Experience kicks off today, and and just like SXSW, the two-day event brings together acts from all over the world.

LA's homeless youth help count their own (Photos)

Every year, volunteers around the nation count the number of homeless in their communities, but a specific segment of the homeless population often gets missed: young people.

Sequestration cuts to cause turbulence at airports

Because of sequestration, the FAA will be furloughing 47,000 employees, including air traffic controllers, starting next month. There might also be epic waits at the security line because the TSA says cuts will reduce their staffing as well.

Massachusetts Battles for the State's Rock Song

California already has an official song -- "I Love You California."

America's spiking hunger problem

Sequestration. Immigration. Gun Control.