Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.


Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

In the news this morning: A White House immigration strategy, Patch Latino in the works, the bin Laden effect on immigration, more

President Obama to ramp up immigration fight - Politico Obama's "sustained personal campaign" will rely in part on recruiting outsiders to pressure Congress to take up the controversial immigration reform issue.

A view from Little Arabia (Video)

KPCC staff videographer Grant Slater caught up with blogger Rashad Al-Dabbagh of the Happy Arab News Service yesterday in Anaheim's Little Arabia, where Al-Dabbagh was at a restaurant when he first heard news of Osama bin Laden's death in Pakistan.

Creating race: How the 'Hispanic or Latino' category came to be

An interesting article published by the Migration Policy Institute examines the racialization of those who make up the “Hispanic, Latino or Spanish Origin" category on census forms.

Who has had to wait the longest for a green card this month?

It’s the beginning of May, which means it's time for another look at the U.S. State Department’s monthly Visa Bulletin. Each month the bulletin lists which categories of hopeful immigrants are up to receive immigrant visas, as well as who has been waiting the longest.

In the news this morning: Hope for Muslims in U.S., immigration reform talks in D.C., 'birthers' undaunted, Latino integration, more

Osama bin Laden death: Experts hopeful that Bin Laden's death will help ease anti-Muslim sentiment in U.S. - Los Angeles Times Some say the tense relations and suspicions faced by Muslims in the U.

Q&A: A Los Angeles Muslim community leader on the damage bin Laden caused U.S. Muslims

The terrorist attacks orchestrated by Osama bin Laden affected all Americans, but they affected American Muslims in a unique way. One of the groups that has called for greater tolerance in the face of anti-Muslim sentiment and tried to clear up misperceptions is the Muslim Public Affairs Council, which has offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.

With bin Laden gone, do U.S. Muslims have a reason for hope?

Throughout the day, Muslim and Middle Eastern community leaders around the country have been coming forward to express relief over the death of Osama bin Laden yesterday during a targeted mission by U.

In the news, this afternoon: Some U.S. Muslims hopeful after bin Laden's death, L.A. immigration march, Secure Communities and states, more

U.S. Muslims hope for better days after bin Laden - Reuters Some are hopeful that Osama bin Laden's death yesterday in Pakistan at the hands of the U.S. will help cast off a stigma attached to their community since the September 11, 2001 attacks.

Five ways in which Osama bin Laden changed the immigration landscape

The direct and indirect repercussions that the late Osama bin Laden's actions in masterminding the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 have had on the agencies, policies and attitudes affecting immigrants in the United States are far too many to mention in a short list.

Secrets of the Latin American supermarket: Part 2

A post yesterday took readers on the first part of a tour of the Superior Grocers warehouse store in Bell, one of many large supermarkets throughout Southern California stocking the foodstuffs and other items Latino shoppers seek.

Home, sort of: A 'Mexican gringo' in Mexico City

Among the many writers appearing this weekend on panels at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, held this year at USC, is one whose book I've been particularly enjoying lately.

Five years after the 'Great American Boycott,' what's changed?

Sunday marks five years since the massive immigration reform marches of May 1, 2006. It was that year, amid a wave of activism, that May 1 first became closely associated with immigration rallies.

In the news this morning: Secure Communities under scrutiny, the other L.A. book festival this weekend, remembering the 1992 riots, more

Immigrants' fingerprinting program under scrutiny - Associated Press California Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren is pushing for an investigation into whether Homeland Security employees lied to the public, local governments and Congress about the Secure Communities immigration enforcement program.

Secrets of the Latin American supermarket

Last week, Multi-American kicked off a series of informal guides to the ethnic supermarket, the mega-bodegas of all flavors that have become part of the regional landscape as Southern California’s immigrant enclaves have grown and evolved.

American snapshot: Chinatown

Almond cookies, tres leches cake y café under one roof at a multilingual bakery on Cesar Chavez Boulevard, at the southern edge of Chinatown.