Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.


Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

In the news this morning: Response to Japan earthquake, looted art from Armenia, minorities and lupus, Arizona's Latino growth, more

Japan earthquake: Japanese American groups in L.A. use Web to respond to quake - Los Angeles Times Japanese American community groups used social networking and other online tools over the weekend to coordinate efforts in response to Friday's killer earthquake.

Japanese American, other organizations in Southern California pull together for quake relief

Two large fundraising events for victims of last week's devastating 8.9 magnitude earthquake in northeastern Japan last week are taking place all day today at Angel Stadium in Anaheim and the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, where "drive-through" donations for the American Red Cross's relief effort are being accepted.

Site posts updates from Japan that are simple, heartbreaking

Throughout the day, as I've followed news of the continuing devastation in northeastern Japan after its 8.9 magnitude quake, I've linked a couple of times to one website that keeps drawing me back for its succinct updates.

Japan quake draws links, comments and prayers on Facebook

As has become the norm during world events lately, one of the ways in which people have been getting togehter to provide information, ask questions or simply comment on the killer earthquake that struck Japan yesterday afternoon is on Facebook.

Japan quake: How to find people, how to help

Several online resources have sprung up in the wake of the 8.9 magnitude earthquake that struck northern Japan, among them a Google People Finder tool in English and Japanese that is part of a Google crisis response resource with emergency numbers and other information.

'Click if you like our champurrado:' Taqueros embrace social media

The other day, I mentioned in a conversation that I'd begun following the acclaimed Nina's Food (@BreedStScene) on Twitter. The old-school Boyle Heights quesadilla expert, who placed first in last year's L.

There are more Latinos in California, but not in Echo Park

Earlier this week, the 2010 census results for California revealed a state in which overall, the white population has shrunk in the last decade, while the Latino population has continued to grow.

Q&A: Temecula imam speaks out about today's House hearing on Islam

Today marked the first hearing in the House Committee on Homeland Security on the "extent of radicalization" among American Muslims, led by committee chair and New York Republican Rep.

Thoughts from Temecula imam about House hearing on Islam

Emotions ran raw Thursday during the House Committee on Homeland Security’s hearings on the “extent of radicalization.” On Wednesday, KPCC’s Multi-American blog spoke to Imam Mahmoud Harmoush of the Islamic Center of Temecula Valley for his thoughts on the hearing.

In the news this morning: House hearings on Islam, immigrants and jobs, a community where CA census trend happened in reverse, more

Fact Checker - Peter King's claim about radical Muslim imams: Is it true? - The Washington Post An examination of what's factual and what isn't behind Rep. Peter King's House hearings on the "extent of radicalization" among American Muslims, which began this morning.

Five good explanations of what the census results mean for California

Yesterday's 2010 Census results for California revealed what was already expected, an increasingly diverse state in which ethnic minorities have together become a majority. Latinos and Asian Americans alone - 37.

Monterey Park: In a majority Asian city, a Latina wins a council seat

Monterey Park did not become the first city in the continental United States to have an all-Asian city council yesterday, as some had anticipated, but it did get an all-minority council that's representative of the majority-minority city's ethnic makeup.

American Muslims: Understanding a little-understood minority

Tomorrow's Congressional hearing on the threat of homegrown Islamic terrorism is likely to be remembered as a key moment defining racial and ethnic relations in the United States in the post-9/11 era.

In the news this morning: CA Census shows Latino children a majority, a Secure Communities analysis, Sikhs being targeted, more

More than half of California children Latino, census shows - The Washington Post 2010 Census numbers released yesterday for California show that barely one in four of state residents under age 18 are non-Hispanic whites, whose numbers declined along with those of black children, as the number of Asian American and Latino children soared.

Californians becoming more Latino, more Asian, more mixed

The California results from the 2010 Census reveal a state that is becoming increasingly Latino, Asian, and to a smaller degree, more multiracial.