Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.


Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

Thoughts from Temecula imam about House hearing on Islam

Emotions ran raw Thursday during the House Committee on Homeland Security’s hearings on the “extent of radicalization.” On Wednesday, KPCC’s Multi-American blog spoke to Imam Mahmoud Harmoush of the Islamic Center of Temecula Valley for his thoughts on the hearing.

In the news this morning: House hearings on Islam, immigrants and jobs, a community where CA census trend happened in reverse, more

Fact Checker - Peter King's claim about radical Muslim imams: Is it true? - The Washington Post An examination of what's factual and what isn't behind Rep. Peter King's House hearings on the "extent of radicalization" among American Muslims, which began this morning.

Five good explanations of what the census results mean for California

Yesterday's 2010 Census results for California revealed what was already expected, an increasingly diverse state in which ethnic minorities have together become a majority. Latinos and Asian Americans alone - 37.

Monterey Park: In a majority Asian city, a Latina wins a council seat

Monterey Park did not become the first city in the continental United States to have an all-Asian city council yesterday, as some had anticipated, but it did get an all-minority council that's representative of the majority-minority city's ethnic makeup.

American Muslims: Understanding a little-understood minority

Tomorrow's Congressional hearing on the threat of homegrown Islamic terrorism is likely to be remembered as a key moment defining racial and ethnic relations in the United States in the post-9/11 era.

In the news this morning: CA Census shows Latino children a majority, a Secure Communities analysis, Sikhs being targeted, more

More than half of California children Latino, census shows - The Washington Post 2010 Census numbers released yesterday for California show that barely one in four of state residents under age 18 are non-Hispanic whites, whose numbers declined along with those of black children, as the number of Asian American and Latino children soared.

Californians becoming more Latino, more Asian, more mixed

The California results from the 2010 Census reveal a state that is becoming increasingly Latino, Asian, and to a smaller degree, more multiracial.

Dispatch from Monterey Park: An all-Asian city council?

A story I linked to in an earlier post today is worth highlighting because, depending on today's municipal voting results, a city in the San Gabriel Valley could make some history.

City candidates reveal increasingly diverse L.A.

Today's municipal elections in Los Angeles and other local cities happen to coincide with the scheduled release this afternoon of 2010 Census data for California, which will show us the racial and ethnic breakdown of the state and how it has changed since ten years ago.

Snow sports industry reacts candidly to Utah's guest worker plan

The snow sports website OnTheSnow.com published an editorial today praising Utah's state legislature for approving a bill that would grant two-year work permits to undocumented workers, provided they pay fines and can prove they have been living and working in the state.

In the news this morning: Utah guest worker plan to face challenges, Latino job insecurity, proponent defends Muslim hearings, more

Utah immigration plan could stir legal storm - USA Today As much at it's a departure from the stricter immigration legislation approved in Arizona last year, Utah's newly approved guest worker bill will most likely wind up in federal court also if it becomes law.

Video: 'I am undocumented'

A young man who arrived in the United States as a small child after he and his mother left Medellín, Colombia tells his story. The video, from last year, is featured in a "coming out" guide put together by Dream Act advocates for a "National Coming Out of the Shadows" week March 14-21.

More Dream Act students prepare to 'come out'

This week, some undocumented students, graduates and others are expected to reprise the actions of other student activists last year with a risky move: going public with their immigration status.

Utah bucks a trend by letting undocumented immigrants work

Last Friday, Utah became the first state to pass its own guest-worker bill, and one of two states lately to weigh anti-illegal immigration legislation that makes a work-related exception for undocumented immigrants.

In the news this morning: Utah's guest worker plan, lawsuit over foreign same-sex spouses, White House to reassures Muslims, more

Utah Republicans Adopt Alternative Approach on Immigration - New York Times Utah has broken ranks with other states cracking down on illegal immigration by passing immigration bills that include a guest worker program which would allow unauthorized immigrants to work legally.