Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.


Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

In the news this morning: Men convicted in PA hate murder sentenced, Oscar snubs, an almost-deported U.S. citizen and more

Luis Ramirez’s Attackers Get Nine Years in Prison for Deadly Beating - ColorLines Two Pennsylvania men have been sentenced for their involvement in the 2008 beating death of Luis Ramirez, a Mexican immigrant.

East LA’s Self Help Graphics is moving

The familiar tile-studded building at the corner of Cesar Chavez Boulevard and Gage Avenue that since the late 1970s has housed Self Help Graphics & Art will no longer be home to the revered art center, an Eastside fixture whose recent years have been rough ones.

East L.A.'s Self Help Graphics is moving

The familiar tile-studded building at the corner of Cesar Chavez Boulevard and Gage Avenue that since the late 1970s has housed Self Help Graphics & Art will no longer be home to the revered art center, an Eastside fixture whose recent years have been rough ones.

What's alleged in the FBI Muslim surveillance lawsuit

A federal lawsuit filed earlier this week alleges that a former FBI informant, an ex-fitness instructor and ex-convict named Craig Monteilh, violated Muslims' freedom of religion when he spied on Orange County mosques for the FBI between 2006 and 2007.

From Arizona, with opinions: Readers respond to immigration bills

Readers' comments are usually vary in length and flavor, but yesterday I received two from Arizona natives that begin similarly and are almost mirror images, though they present two very different Grand Canyon State points of view.

In the news this morning: A racially diverse Oregon, Muslims targeted, biracial twins, Arizona's stringent immigration proposals, more

Oregon's 2010 Census shows striking Latino and Asian gains - OregonLive.com New census data is showing that Oregon's Latino population climbed 63 percent in 10 years. The state's Asian population has also grown dramatically, by 41 percent.

American snapshot: Hawthorne

Chivo, taro leaves, and ghee: The city that is the home of the Beach Boys is also home to a diverse population that's close to a third African American, half Latino and around six percent Asian, with a small Pacific Islander population as well.

'I'm torn:' A death penalty opponent reacts to the sentencing of Brisenia Flores' convicted killer

As Arizona state senators yesterday prepared to hear some of the strictest anti-illegal immigration legislation to come out of the state since SB 1070, a convicted murderer whose crime was rooted in one of the darker corners of the immigration debate was sentenced to death in Tucson.

In the news this morning: More on Arizona immigration crackdown bills, death penalty for the Brisenia Flores murder, Ruben Salazar report re

Arizona immigration bills aim for bigger crackdown - Arizona Republic A state senate committee gives the go-ahead to the most stringent immigration enforcement measures in the state since SB 1070.

Arizona back in spotlight after senate committee OKs stringent immigration bills

Just like that, Arizona finds itself back at the epicenter of the debate over how far a state can go with immigration enforcement, with perhaps more anti-illegal immigration legislation pending than ever before.

Adopted parents, adopted children: How two mothers reconnected with their Korean roots

New American Media featured a moving story this weekend from Hyphen magazine, which covers the Asian American diaspora. It told the stories of two Korean adoptees who, when deciding to adopt children themselves, turned to the country of their birth.

What really led to Brisenia Flores' murder?

Since the conviction last week of Shawna Forde for murder in the 2009 home invasion slaying of a Latino father and his 9-year-old daughter in rural Arivaca, Arizona, there have been sighs of relief among those who had called for justice, but also bitter questions about how the murder and trial were covered by media, in particular the degree of attention paid to Forde's radical nativism.

Forty years later, controversy over journalist Ruben Salazar's death lives on

Over the past several days, the Los Angles Times has featured an extensive compilation of records pertaining to the life and death of veteran journalist Ruben Salazar, an award-winning Times columnist and news director for KMEX-TV who was killed in 1970 during a violent protest in East Los Angeles.

In the news this morning: Doubts linger over Salazar's death, an 'omnibus' immigration bill in Arizona, Miami housewives, more

Ruben Salazar: A witness remains suspicious about Ruben Salazar's death - Los Angeles Times The draft version of a report due out today does not assign blame for the death of the veteran Los Angeles journalist during a 1970 protest, but a photographer who witnessed the scene outside the building in which Salazar was struck by a tear gas projectile still has his doubts.

A few good late-morning reads for a holiday Monday

It's a holiday, so today's list is a little different. No big headlines, just a few eclectic selections published over the weekend that are better suited to leisurely reading over a third cup of coffee: