Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.


Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

In the news this morning: More migrants kidnapped, a 2010 immigration timeline, tighter laws expected, paisa bars and more

El Salvador: 3 migrants abducted in Mexico, 5 flee - The Associated Press El Salvador's foreign ministry reports that nine migrants were kidnapped from a train in Mexico last week; five escaped, one died and three are missing.

Top five immigration stories of 2010, #5: The Tamaulipas migrant massacre

Immigration has been one of the biggest topics in the news this year, pretty much as it has been nearly every year during the past decade. This year was of special interest, however, not only in terms of what happened (as in Arizona's partial enactment of its precedent-setting SB 1070), but also because of what didn't happen, as in the recent defeat of the Dream Act.

More gratuitous lunchtime tamales

The holidays aren't over yet, right?

Dissecting culture's role in decision-making

On the heels of weeks of Christmas shopping in stores filled with far too many perplexing choices, New American Media published a great Q&A this weekend with Columbia University business professor Sheena Iyengar, author of the book "The Art of Choosing.

In the news this morning: A town that Latinos are leaving, big political shift expected on immigration, the value of Kwanzaa and more

Citing police abuse, Hispanics leaving Conn. town - The Associated Press Racial profiling allegations began about two years ago in East Haven, a predominantly Italian-American suburb 70 miles northeast of New York City.

American snapshot: Christmas in Alhambra

Santa flies the Stars and Stripes outside a Latino household in the San Gabriel Valley majority minority city, whose population is about half Asian and a third Latino. Alhambra recently became home to a multilingual community news website in English, Spanish and Mandarin.

In the news, this afternoon: Immigration reform prospects dim, another migrant kidnapping, more

In new Congress, detours ahead for immigration bills - USA Today From Roy Beck, executive director of NumbersUSA, which advocates for restricted immigration: "Nothing is going to happen.

'The landscape we'll be exploring,' revisited

A good late morning to all.

No House vote on Armenian genocide resolution

A hoped for last-minute House vote on a resolution that would have officially recognized the Armenian genocide of nearly a century ago didn't happen today, as representatives adjourned for the holidays without a floor vote.

Tamales: Tales, tips, and a recipe

The Latino culture site Remezcla tweeted this today:

Mapping the nation by race, income and more

The U.S. Census Bureau has yet to release specific data on race and ethnicity for the 2010 census, the initial results of which were released yesterday. But in the meantime, a new interactive mapping project put together by the New York Times helps make fascinating sense of who lives where.

In the news this morning: Lowered expectations for immigration reform, SB 1070 and the census, red states' Latino political wild card and mo

Immigration overhaul: Obama, Latino lawmakers take pragmatic view - Los Angeles Times Prospects for a broad overhaul have dimmed, the president and Latino lawmakers agreed Tuesday; a more realistic goal will be to avoid legislation that targets undocumented immigrants.

Ibarra vs. Abuelita on a cold night

It's late at night and hot chocolate calls - which to choose? After faithfully buying Ibarra for as long as I can remember, I have found myself with the two leading rivals in the Mexican hot chocolate market (stateside, at least) in my kitchen, after receiving some Abuelita as a gift.

Making sense of the census: Population growth and Latino political clout

So this we know from the 2010 Census, the initial results of which were released today: There are now 308,745,538 people believed to be living in the United States. California remains the nation's most populous state, though its population only grew by 10 percent since 2000, not enough for the state to gain any new seats in Congress.

Q&A: UCSD immigration expert Wayne Cornelius on why the Dream Act went down

The defeat in the Senate last Saturday of the Dream Act, which would have granted conditional legal status to qualifying undocumented college students, graduates and military hopefuls who arrived here before age 16, was just the most recent action on a proposal that has been circulating for nearly a decade.