Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.


Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

Tamales: Tales, tips, and a recipe

The Latino culture site Remezcla tweeted this today:

Mapping the nation by race, income and more

The U.S. Census Bureau has yet to release specific data on race and ethnicity for the 2010 census, the initial results of which were released yesterday. But in the meantime, a new interactive mapping project put together by the New York Times helps make fascinating sense of who lives where.

In the news this morning: Lowered expectations for immigration reform, SB 1070 and the census, red states' Latino political wild card and mo

Immigration overhaul: Obama, Latino lawmakers take pragmatic view - Los Angeles Times Prospects for a broad overhaul have dimmed, the president and Latino lawmakers agreed Tuesday; a more realistic goal will be to avoid legislation that targets undocumented immigrants.

Ibarra vs. Abuelita on a cold night

It's late at night and hot chocolate calls - which to choose? After faithfully buying Ibarra for as long as I can remember, I have found myself with the two leading rivals in the Mexican hot chocolate market (stateside, at least) in my kitchen, after receiving some Abuelita as a gift.

Making sense of the census: Population growth and Latino political clout

So this we know from the 2010 Census, the initial results of which were released today: There are now 308,745,538 people believed to be living in the United States. California remains the nation's most populous state, though its population only grew by 10 percent since 2000, not enough for the state to gain any new seats in Congress.

Q&A: UCSD immigration expert Wayne Cornelius on why the Dream Act went down

The defeat in the Senate last Saturday of the Dream Act, which would have granted conditional legal status to qualifying undocumented college students, graduates and military hopefuls who arrived here before age 16, was just the most recent action on a proposal that has been circulating for nearly a decade.

In the news this morning: The 2010 Census and minorities, deportations raise questions, more

As U.S. becomes more diverse, Hispanics flourish - Reuters According to data emerging from the 2010 U.S. Census, Latinos are leading a transformation of the country, with ethnic and racial minorities expected to become the majority by mid-century.

After the Dream Act vote, a few more good reads

With the amount of student activism surrounding it and the coverage it has received, the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, otherwise known as the Dream Act, has perhaps been the biggest immigration story of 2010.

For Los Angeles, a 'multiplicity of corridos'

I didn't have a chance to make it to a performance Saturday afternoon by Ozomatli at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where the band performed the top entries in a contest seeking the "The Corrido of L.

Gratuitous lunchtime tamales photo

Three weeks into December, four more days to Noche Buena. Had enough of these yet?

From readers, more thoughts on the Dream Act

Thanks to everyone who joined the discussion on the Dream Act this weekend, after Saturday's procedural vote in the Senate. I spent the morning with a group of students and other supporters as they made last-minute calls to legislators and watched the vote take place on C-SPAN, posting updates as the voting proceeded.

In the news this morning: The Dream Act defeat, a custody battle over an immigrant workers' son, Latino voters in Compton and more

Students look to 2012 after immigration bill fails - The Washington Post After months of activism in hopes of passing the Dream Act, which would have granted conditional legal status to undocumented students and military hopefuls, students were disappointed by the bill's failure in the Senate Saturday, but say they aren't giving up.

'It didn't happen today:' Dream Act fails, but supporters vow to keep trying

The Dream Act, which would have granted conditional legal status to certain undocumented youths who attend at least two years of college or join the military, fell five votes short of the 60 votes needed for cloture in the Senate.

As Senate votes on Dream Act, students wait

Multi-American

Waiting for the Dream Act vote

A vote on the Dream Act is expected shortly in the Senate. The bill would grant conditional legal status to undocumented youths who attend college or join the military, provided they arrived in the United States before age 16 and meet other strict criteria.