Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

Immigrants hurry to apply for EB-5 visas before December

The visa program was due to sunset Sept. 30. But Congress extended the program through Dec. 11. Local EB-5 business centers say they've seen an uptick in interest.

For Mexico soccer fans, cheering the national team is easy

This week at the El Mercadito shopping center in East Los Angeles, it seemed everybody was talking about the big game Saturday.

Are new police patrols in Highland Park on the right path?

New foot patrols are stationed along Figueroa, where high-end shops have sprung up in recent years, but some residents say that's not where they're needed.

Immigrants prep to apply for state professional licenses

Under California law, immigrants without legal status can apply for professional licenses. That's brought a new crop of students to one cosmetology school in Downey.

Do business in LA parks, beaches? You need a permit

The city has banned unpermitted business in parks and beaches, and enforcement begins Monday. Push cart vendors aren't eligible for permits, so some are on the move.

Why the US could see more African refugees in future years

The U.S. will allow in 100,000 refugees starting in 2017, a 30 percent increase. Displaced Syrians will benefit most, but Africans are likely to follow.

LA County will continue to cooperate with immigration agents

After hearing feedback from residents on how sheriff's deputies should police and detain deportable immigrants accused of crimes, the department released slightly updated policies.

Conservative Latinos embrace state GOP's move on immigration

The California Republican party this weekend voted to remove a statement from its platform that read "allowing illegal immigrants to remain in California undermines respect for the law."

Spouses of H-1B visa holders struggle to re-enter workforce

They came to the U.S. when their husbands were hired for high-skilled positions. A new federal policy allows them to work, but the job market is not kind.

Arcadia company's virtual currency a scam, immigrants say

State officials are investigating a local company that marketed a product called "GemCoin," billed as a virtual currency backed by gemstones.

Why more local cops and cities are logged into Weibo

Known as "China's Twitter," Weibo is how many San Gabriel Valley officials communicate and build bonds with their immigrant communities.

Immigration protests continue in Huntington Park

Last month, the city council appointed two men who don't have legal immigration status to serve as commissioners. That ignited protests, which have delayed their start

US could soon see more Syrian refugees

The State Department says the U.S. will accept more than 5000 refugees next year. Local Syrian Americans say it's not enough.

How foreign dollars are changing El Monte

As more Chinese investors look to build in the city, El Monte's leaders are cracking down on illegal dumping. They also fought to keep a county probation center out.

LA street vending is big business, but not yet legal

It's a $500 million industry in LA. As vendors wait for a legalization plan at city hall, some have moved forward, securing health permits and renting commercial space