Leslie Berestein Rojas

Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

As Haitians' US stay restricted, others fear they're next

Haitians living temporarily in the U.S. following an earthquake in 2010 could lose their protection next year, making Central Americans and others nervous.

Tempered optimism over a new 'Dream Act' bill in the Trump era

A new version of legislation long known as the Dream Act has returned to the Senate. But the bipartisan bill likely faces an uphill climb.

Supreme Court order again narrows the door for US-bound refugees

The U.S. Supreme Court has stayed part of a lower court's ruling last week that opened the door for more refugees to arrive in the United States.

Reopened deportation cases up more than 60 percent in LA

Reopened deportation cases are up more than 60 percent in Los Angeles as immigrants who were once assured they could stay in the country find that may longer be so.

Trump travel ban hits refugee admissions

After Wednesday, refugees will need to prove a bona fide relationship with a close family member or a U.S. entity to enter the country.

Refugees seeking US entry under travel ban likely out of luck

According to the U.S. State Department, a relationship with a resettlement agency is not enough to clear the way for a refugee to enter the U.S. under the latest travel ban.

No disruptions at LAX as latest travel ban rolls out

The first day of the reinstated travel ban limiting travel from six Muslim-majority countries passed without large protests or reported traveler delays.

Who is affected by the revised travel ban

Under a court order, those from six countries with valid visas and ties with a person or entity here should be clear to enter the U.S. The key word is "should."

How the travel ban might play out in Los Angeles

In reinstating a partial travel ban, the Supreme Court said those who lack established ties to a person, workplace, or other U.S. entity could be temporarily barred.

LA City Council approves $2M for immigrant defense fund

The council voted 11-1 Friday to contribute the money to the L.A. Justice Fund to cover legal services for immigrants fighting deportation.

Lincoln Heights father fighting deportation wins one victory

A judge set aside a 1998 misdemeanor conviction against Romulo Avelica Gonzalez, who immigration agents arrested after he dropped off a daughter at school.

LA County approves funding to fight deportations

Los Angeles County supervisors voted 4-1 to contribute $3 million over the next two years to a fund that will combine county, city, and philanthropic money to cover legal costs for immigrants facing deportation. But those convicted of violent felonies will be excluded from the county money.

Trump administration lets DACA stand for now

The Trump administration says it won’t shut down the program that allows young immigrants to live and work temporarily in the U.S., but its future is unclear.

California moves to bar local government from immigrant detention contracts

Existing agreements to provide detention space would stand under the measure, but local governments would be unable to expand contracts to add more beds.

6 immigrants end hunger strike at Adelanto detention center

The men, who had refused meals at the Adelanto facility, have begun eating again. Supporters say they are protesting what they call poor living conditions.