Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.


Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

California's ‘anti-Arizona’ bill on way to governor’s desk

A bill that would limit cooperation between state and local cops and federal immigration officials has cleared a final Assembly vote and now heads to Gov. Brown.

Anti-deferred action lawsuit brought by ICE agents and activists

A lawsuit filed today against top Homeland Security officials by immigration agents opposed to deferred action, which promises to grant temporary legal status to some young undocumented immigrants, has the support of high-profile immigration restriction advocates.

Attitudes toward children of undocumented immigrants have eased - sort of

Attitudes toward the children of undocumented immigrants receiving free public education have changed quite a bit since the days following California's epic Proposition 187 battle in 1994, when Californians voted to bar undocumented immigrants from public services, including public schools.

In the news this morning: Driver's license debate over deferred action, GOP embraces 'self-deportation,' kids and health disparities, more

Driver's license rules fuel new immigration debate - CNN Arizona's Gov. Jan Brewer was the first to state that Arizona would not grant driver's licenses to young people who qualify for legal status under deferred action; now officials in other states are following her lead.

Attitudes toward children of undocumented immigrants have eased – sort of

A new poll suggests that Americans' attitudes toward children of undocumented immigrants receiving free public education have softened since 1995. But a majority still oppose it.

Out sick, back soon

I'm out sick at the moment, but hopefully not for long.

Latinos and college: From 'get a college education' to 'get a college degree'

A post yesterday with details from a report that shows record Latino enrollment on U.S. college and university campuses drew some thoughtful comments from readers.

SB 1070 watch: Might the law's 'reasonable suspicion' section remain blocked?

The judge who initially blocked key provisions of Arizona's SB 1070 anti-illegal immigration law in 2010 is weighing part of the law once more, this time deciding if and when a provision that allows local cops to check for immigration status goes into effect.

Survey says: Latinos get saddled with worst immigrant stereotypes

From a relatively obscure study in Ohio comes this: While Americans don't necessarily tie what they believe to be the traits of Asian, Middle Eastern or European immigrants to their views about the effects immigration, their perception of Latinos, or rather negative Latino stereotypes, colors their views about immigration a great deal.

In the news this morning: Attacks against U.S. Muslims, legislative support for undocumented law school grad, SB 1070 back to court, more

Spate of attacks near Ramadan trouble U.S. Muslims - CNN The suspicious burning of a mosque in Joplin, Missouri, during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan might be one of a series of incidents targeting Muslims lately, including vandalism at a Muslim cemetery in Illinois.

Survey says: Latinos get saddled with worst immigrant stereotypes

A University of Cincinnati study suggests that while Americans don't necessarily tie their perception of other immigrant groups to how they feel about immigration, their perception of Latinos, or rather negative Latino stereotypes, colors their views a great deal.

More Latinos in U.S. colleges than ever as enrollment keeps rising

The Pew Hispanic Center has a new report out today that documents the continued rise of Latino student enrollment, from public elementary school through college.

'I have a quick question...': Questions from deferred action applicants pour in

A post from last week with a few basics on who can apply for deferred action, a form of temporary legal status under a new policy benefiting young undocumented immigrants, has drawn more than150 comments so far.

In the news this morning: Deferred action no end to hurdles, adoptee immigration case, shifting demographics in San Fernando Valley, more

For Young Immigrants Who Get Deferrals, The Battle Is Far From Over - Reuters Young undocumented immigrants who qualify for temporary legal status under deferred action will have protection from deportation and be able to apply for work permits, but they won't have all the same rights as legal residents.

More Latinos in US colleges than ever as enrollment rises

A new report says Latinos ages 18-24 now make up a record 16.5 percent share of enrollments in U.S. colleges and universities. More are graduating with degrees.