Leslie Berestein Rojas Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter

Leslie Berestein-Rojas
Contact Leslie Berestein Rojas

Leslie Berestein Rojas is KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.

An award-winning journalist with several years’ experience reporting on immigration issues, Berestein Rojas most recently covered immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border for the San Diego Union-Tribune. She has retraced the steps of migrants along desert smuggling trails, investigated immigrant detention contractors, and told the stories of families left behind in Mexico’s migrant-sending towns.

A native of Cuba raised in Los Angeles, Leslie has also written for Time, People, the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times. She has reported from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.


Stories by Leslie Berestein Rojas

Photos: Diwali in Southern California, from Artesia to Pasadena

Diwali, the "Festival of Lights," has its roots in India and surrounding nations, but is celebrated around Southern California by local Hindus, Sikhs and others.

Disney's 'Sofia the First': How does a real Latina princess look?

Disney's first "Latina" princess, who turned out to be not quite Latina after all, has inspired one mom to show the world what real-life Latina princesses look like.

In the news this morning: Immigration reform and the GOP, growing Asian American political clout, Diwali, more

Republicans rethink immigration reform after Romney loses Latino vote - Huffington Post Some GOP leaders have been publicly talking about the possibility of supporting immigration reform, but "the party remains divided over whether it will support a path to citizenship for the undocumented -- an issue that could cause problems and legislative delays in the Republican-controlled House.

Changing demographics and the GOP: Three good reads

Three writers analyze the electoral demographics and offer thoughtful takes on the changing face of the nation

Who had the longest wait for an immigrant visa this month?

The lines for family-sponsored visas are especially slow for immigrants coming from certain countries; some filed paperwork more than two decades ago.

American snapshot: Veterans Day

This isn't the first itme I've posted this photo, but I like it. The banner with this Marine's name was hanging along with many others featuring names of local service members - most of them also with Latino surnames - along the main streets a couple of years ago in Bell Gardens, a city in southeast Los Angeles County.

In the news this morning: The possibility of immigration reform, Latinos and the GOP's future, immigrants and 'American culture,' more

Immigration reform could be on new Congress' agenda - Boston Globe Since President Obama's reelection last week, aided by the support of Latino voters, "several Republican leaders, including House Speaker John Boehner, have said the GOP needs to reckon with immigration reform and pass a comprehensive bill.

Which Californians stayed home most on Election Day?

While overall voting numbers were down this year, voters of color – especially young ones – were a larger percentage of the electorate in California.

How black, Latino and Asian American voters delivered Obama's victory

Gauging whether the influence of nonwhite voters reached a tipping point this presidential election

Latino voters play big role again for Obama

Latinos vote in large numbers for Obama again. Despite Republican predictions, Latinos' share of the overall vote is steadily rising.

'I will tweet from the Brown House': What will become of 'Mexican Mitt?'

If Mitt Romney doesn't win the White House, will his Twitter parody alter-ego "Mexican Mitt" vamoose?

An Election Day news roundup: The voters of color edition

A sampling of the many Election Day stories about the ways voters of color figure into this year's presidential election.

Five new Asian languages make their debut at the polls

Asian American voters who speak Hindi, Thai, Khmer, Gujarati and Bengali will for the first time have access to voter materials and bilingual assistance this election day in L.A. County.

In the news this morning: Immigrants and criminal convictions, reaching out to new voters, a Russian immigration protest, more

Immigration consequences of criminal convictions - Fronteras Desk Since the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Padilla v. Kentucky two years ago, attorneys have had to be especially careful as to how they counsel foreign-born clients.

Sandy tragedy in Staten Island: Would you have let Glenda Moore in?

One episode in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy raises questions about who we're willing to help in a crisis.