Marc Haefele Commentator, Off-Ramp

Off-Ramp commentator Marc Haefele.
Contact Marc Haefele

Marc Haefele is an arts, politics, and literature commentator for KPCC's Off Ramp.

Haefele was a staff writer for LA Weekly, City News of Los Angeles, and the Morristown (NJ) Record. He has written for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Philadelphia Daily News, the Boston Review, Nomada de Buenos Aires and many other publications.

He cohosted the KPFK weekday morning drive time show in 1999-2000, and for the subsequent decade was city hall commentator for KPCC.

In the later 60s and early 70s, Haefele worked for Random House, then Doubleday publishers in New York, where his writers included Philip K. Dick, Steven King, Tom Disch, Marge Piercy, Kate Millett and Josephine Saxton. While at LA Weekly, he won the LA Press Club's Best Column award. He has shared Golden Mikes with his KPCC colleagues.

He has an M.A. in history from NYU and Cal State Los Angeles.

Haefele lives in Santa Monica.

Stories by Marc Haefele

New Getty exhibit 'Zeitgeist' highlights anti-sensual German art

Suddenly, there emerged German painters who became famous even in France and England. One major sect distanced itself from all art since the Renaissance.

See one of the 'greatest marine painters' at Pasadena Museum of California Art

Armin Hansen was one of greatest marine painters ever born in this state. His portrayals of the men who worked on the oceans off Monterey that brought him lasting fame.

The Huntington unveils big changes, but not too big

They promised us a new visitor center, store, and café. I imagined the Disney-fied worst: Henry Huntington’s Roller Coaster Red Car Ride; Pinky’s Pinkberry Parlor; The Blue Boy Fashion Center.

Cameroon's Pascale Tayou 'coaxes poetry' out of mundane objects

Cameroonian Pascale Marthine Tayou considers himself a world artist, a cosmopolitan nomad, with so many influences that it’s hard to count them.

Getty Villa shows off a trove of Roman silver a French farmer almost destroyed

It was all too much for the rustic, pious Monsieur Taurin. Such pagan sensuality had to be diabolical. He used his pickax to rake the priceless pieces into a sack.

Fire ravages builder Geoff Palmer's newest downtown Italian-aint apartment house

Marc Haefele tells us about Geoff Palmer, who thinks the Italians settled LA, and who lost one of his mammoth Italianate apartment blocks in a fire Monday morning.

The Getty's new $65M Manet: 'Spring' from an artist in the autumn of his life

“Spring” became one of Manet’s most popular works, deeply appreciated by art lovers young and old and by critics of both the old guard and the avant garde.

'Josef Koudelka: Nationality Doubtful' photos at the Getty Center

With their dark, shadowy contrasts, Koudelka’s pictures resemble impressionist paintings more than photographs. Their subjects loom, threaten and then seem to beg for mercy.

Huntington exhibit: Who captured iconic photos in England? Two Americans!

Paul Caponigro supposedly said, “I love people. I just don’t want them getting in front of my camera.” But his contemporary, Bruce Davidson, made his living photographing people.

LA Opera's doubleheader 'like Bambi Meets Godzilla'

"Dido & Aeneas" and "Bluebeard's Castle" create an enjoyable evening together by being a welcome departure from L.A. Opera’s chestnut repertory.

Review: Joseph Marcell in a lucid 'King Lear' at the Broad Stage

"It’s a lucid imaginative mounting of one of the greatest plays of all time — a play that remains, after more than four centuries, as terribly accessible as ever."

Skirball Center exhibit celebrates Nazi targets who changed Hollywood

Maybe it’s time we had an entire museum dedicated to the cultural migration that transformed Hollywood when the Nazis took power.

Remembering Daniel Pearl: Journalist, violinist

Daniel Pearl, the martyred journalist, is being remembered by thousands of concerts around the world, and one of them is Sunday in Santa Monica

New exhibit rediscovers a lost generation of San Francisco artists

Jess, Duncan, and their circle feel like an all-embracing family you never got to meet — and you can’t stop wishing you’d been a part of it.

World's oldest play, 'Persians,' has message for today

Aeschylus' message from 2,500 years ago to the 21st Century: "Indulging in pointless wars can destroy even the greatest nation.”