Meghan McCarty Carino Commuting and Mobility Reporter

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Contact Meghan McCarty Carino

Meghan McCarty covers commuting and mobility issues for KPCC. Got a gripe about gridlock or public transit? She’d love to hear from you.

She gets to work in a car - for now – but occasionally jumps on the Metro and walks as often as she can. She's looking for advice to become a more intrepid biker.

Meghan has been with KPCC since 2010, when she was hired as an Associate Producer for The Madeleine Brand Show, where she created her signature Weekend Alibi datebook feature. She went on to report, produce and edit for Take Two Show, KPCC's award-winning morning newsmagazine.

Meghan has contributed to public media outlets up and down California, from KQED in San Francisco and KVIE in Sacramento to KCET TV in L.A. She has reported abroad from South Africa, Germany, India, Israel and the West Bank.

Meghan got her Masters from USC's Annenberg School of Journalism and her B.A. in English from UCLA, but she is not torn when it comes to rooting for sports teams (it would be impolitic to reveal her allegiance).

Meghan would love to hear from you. Send her story ideas, grumbles and comments at memccarty [at] scpr.org


Stories by Meghan McCarty Carino

LA street sweeper tickets could become thing of the past

Los Angeles is looking to pilot a program to reduce the number of parking tickets given on street sweeping days. Turns out, there's an app for that.

Tips for eclipse parking at Griffith Observatory

Officials are advising visitors to try to arrive without a car, and the park is offering extra DASH bus service from the Metro Red Line station up the hill.

Union Station changes call for more space for walkers, less for cars

The public is invited to comment on LA Metro's planned changes to the areas surrounding Union Station. Comments can be submitted by email or at a Sept. 13 workshop.

Long Beach mayor out to raise Blue Line's ridership

Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia wants improvements to Blue Line, which has been losing ridership amid concerns about safety and delays.

Important 2028 Olympic transit line hangs on federal funding

By 2028, Los Angeles will have rail to the airport, an extension of the Gold Line and more. But will the key subway to Westwood be ready for the Olympics?

LA buses have gotten slower, increasingly off-schedule

As the on-time performance of Metro buses has declined, so has ridership. The transit agency is looking at ways to improve the service.

LA reverses course on road changes in Playa del Rey

After petitions, recall campaigns and threats of lawsuits over lane reductions, the city has found a new way to address safety concerns on Vista del Mar.

Overnight lane closures on 405 freeway near LAX

It's not quite as epic as Carmageddon but the closures on one of the country's busiest freeways are sure to inconvenience some drivers.

California gets ready to begin roadwork with new funds

Revenue from a gas tax hike adopted earlier this year won't start flowing in until the fall, but state officials want to jump-start road repair projects.

Angels Flight railway prepares to ascend once again

The shortest railway in the world has been closed in recent years due to safety issues, but after upgrades it's nearly ready to ascend again.

Gold Line extension raising questions of Metrolink competition

Metro's Gold Line extension and Metrolink's San Gabriel route are serving the same areas, prompting efforts to avoid competition.

LA Metro launches bike sharing in Pasadena

Riders can now hop on a shared bike from the Gold Line to the Rose Bowl and many points in between as Metro brings 300 bikes to Pasadena.

Expo Line hits ridership goal early but can't grow much more

The popular beach-bound line has surpassed its projected ridership for 2030, but Metro can't add much more capacity to sustain ridership growth.

Metro bike-share turns one, still has modest ridership

Metro could expand its appeal in low-income communities of color by offering a way to ride without a credit card, according to new research.

Sales tax hikes might sting, but less than they used to

Sales taxes burden lower-income people more, but in general consumers have been spending less of their income on taxable goods than in decades past.