Michelle Lanz Associate Producer, The Frame

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Contact Michelle Lanz

Michelle Lanz is the Associate Producer for The Frame, KPCC's arts, entertainment and culture show. Prior to joining The Frame she worked as the digital producer for KPCC's Take Two and AirTalk shows.

Before coming to KPCC, Michelle worked at KCET as the Associate Producer for New Media, where she developed web content for KCET's programming and steered social media efforts for the station. She was first bitten by the public radio bug as an intern for NPR's Day to Day program in 2008.

She has also worked as an editor for MSN's Wonderwall entertainment site, as a web producer for Marketplace and as a contributing editor to the L.A. Times’ Metromix publication.

Lanz earned her master's degree in journalism in 2009 from the University of Southern California's Annenberg School.


Stories by Michelle Lanz

Lawsuit claims 'Happy Birthday' song should be in the public domain

The song is seldom used on screen because producers have to pay usage fees, but a documentary filmmaker is challenging the copyright.

Conan O'Brien, TBS sued for allegedly poaching jokes from Twitter

Comedy writer Alex Kaseberg filed a lawsuit against the talk show host and his team, claiming they stole jokes from his Twitter feed.

'The Bachelorette': Scoring heartbreak and drama with reality TV composer Brad Segal

The high drama of the show has managed to hold audiences for more than a decade, but that drama is highly reliant on the music cues included in each scene.

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei gets passport back, plans Germany visit

The government confiscated his passport in 2011 after Ai Weiwei was detained in the Beijing airport and held for 81 days.

Buzzy Sundance films fail to deliver at the box office

“Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” and "Dope," both of which were darlings at this year's Sundance Film Festival, were unable to capitalize on their hype.

YouTube hopes homegrown stars, original content will lure paying subscribers

Can the world's most popular video site leverage its content into an ad-free service that audiences will pay a monthly fee for?

How artist Lisa Hanawalt designed the 'wonky' world of 'BoJack Horseman'

The production designer for the Netflix show discusses her history, as well as the story behind the popular animated series.

Directing 'Ant-Man' was a dream for self-proclaimed comic book nerd Peyton Reed

As a fan of Marvel Comics since childhood, Reed has a deep understanding and respect for Ant-Man's place in history, regardless of his diminutive size.

Netflix and Amazon snag 46 Emmy noms — more than any major TV network

Andy Greenwald, a writer for Grantland, says he's pleasantly surprised that the TV academy is embracing programming from upstart streaming services.

'Tangerine' director finds an unlikely cinematic muse in LA's 'unofficial red light district'

Filmmakers Sean Baker and Radium Cheung talk about basing their film with two trans actresses around a notorious Los Angeles neighborhood.

Tig Notaro documentary follows the comedian's life after a breast cancer diagnosis

In 2012, Tig Notaro responded to her life-changing event with another one: she went through with a scheduled performance and the resulting show became legendary.

Shark Week: Can music change the public's perception of sharks?

J. Ralph is an Academy Award-nominated composer. But his latest project is on a much smaller scale and a much smaller screen — the Discovery Channel.

Deadheads prepare for frenzied final Grateful Dead shows in Chicago

When The Grateful Dead announced that they would be playing a handful of shows that would be both a celebration of the band's 50 years and also their final shows, people lost their minds.

Fat actresses still often defined by size while 'dadbods' become cool

Actress Julie Brister talked with the Frame about what it's like being a "Fat Amy"-sized actress in Hollywood, and how she's been able to take roles that aren't demeaning.

How TV shows like 'Modern Family' helped shape perceptions of same-sex marriage (POLL)

Salon writer Andrew O'Hehir and an MIT professor Edward Schiappa weigh in on how the portrayal of same-sex couples on television has affected real perceptions.