Mike Roe Digital News Producer

Mike Roe
Contact Mike Roe

Mike Roe is a digital news producer for Southern California Public Radio and covers pop culture online and on air. Mike joined KPCC after working for KCTS public television in Seattle. He's covered events like Comic-Con, as well as breaking news.

Mike began his broadcast career at his high school radio station KMIH in Mercer Island, Washington, where he served as president and program director. From there he moved on to college and community radio and interned in commercial radio.

He earned a BA in history from St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, and also spent time studying communications, music and religion.

When he's not covering the waterfront for KPCC, Mike writes and performs with several sketch comedy groups, including the monthly late night variety show It's Past My Bedtime and weekly topical show Top Story Weekly. He's graduated from both the improv and sketch comedy programs at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre.


Stories by Mike Roe

Marc Maron tells us 'WTF' is with him interviewing the president

We have the first interview with Marc Maron after he interviewed the president. He tells us what the deal is and what kind of laughs he got from the Secret Service.

E3 2015: 'Star Wars: Battlefront,' Oculus Rift and gaming's future

We tried out virtual reality headset the Oculus Rift. It may not be as immersive as you would hope quite yet, but it looks like it's the future of gaming.

5 lessons from 'Jurassic World's' $524 million opening

“Jurassic World” just had the biggest opening weekend in Hollywood history, grossing $208.8 million domestically and more than $524 million globally.

'Me and Earl and the Dying Girl': How the director dealt with personal loss

When we first met the director at Sundance, he’d just completed the movie and we were one of his first interviews. The film's dedicated to his father, and he let us know what that meant.

FFS brings Franz Ferdinand and Sparks together for smart pop

New supergroup FFS brings two generations together, combining Scottish band Franz Ferdinand and Los Angeles band Sparks in a collaboration from 6,000 miles apart.

'The Wolfpack' follows isolated brothers with a film obsession

Director Crystal Moselle documents the brothers whose obsessive relationship with films connects them to the outside world in a story that's almost impossible to believe.

LA Film Festival: Finding its voice by focusing on women and LA

If you want to see the latest movies made outside the studio system, you head to Sundance. The Los Angeles Film Festival remains one that's yet to be fully defined.

WWDC 2015: Apple Music streaming service announced

Apple announced their new Apple Music service, a successor to Dr. Dre's Beats service which the company previously purchased, during WWDC on Monday.

Vance Joy goes from Australia to opening for Taylor Swift

The Australian singer-songwriter James Keogh, better known as Vance Joy, is already becoming one of the biggest acts in the music industry — and he’s only released one album, “Dream Your Life Away,” which debuted less than a year ago.

'Love & Mercy' goes inside Beach Boys mastermind Brian Wilson's mind

The film focuses on two parts of Wilson's life: His creative peak making the imaginative "Pet Sounds," and his days dealing with schizophrenia and a controlling therapist.

Algiers uses punk rock to talk social injustice and racism

Rolling Stone named Algiers one of the 10 new acts you need to know in 2015, describing their music as “spiritual, political and confrontational.” We help you get to know them.

Stephen Colbert announces 'Late Show' band leader Jon Batiste

Colbert is re-emerging and making a series of announcements about his version of "The Late Show."

Why female A-list stars have romantic interests who are decades older

Young A-list female stars like Emma Stone and Jennifer Lawrence are part of a trend pushing out actresses in their thirties and presenting unrealistic relationships.

LA Phil's Dudamel on reaching younger, less affluent audiences

The artistic director of the L.A. Philharmonic talked with us about why he chose to stay in L.A. over New York or Berlin, and how classical can reach younger, less white, less rich audiences.

Paul Feig on directing and writing for funny women

Feig tells us how he makes movies like "Bridesmaids," the new "Spy" and the upcoming all-female "Ghostbusters," how he got into and out of movie directing jail and shares his creative process.