Mike Roe Digital News Producer

Mike Roe
Contact Mike Roe

Mike Roe is a digital news producer for Southern California Public Radio and covers pop culture online and on air. Mike joined KPCC after working for KCTS public television in Seattle. He's covered events like Comic-Con, as well as breaking news.

Mike began his broadcast career at his high school radio station KMIH in Mercer Island, Washington, where he served as president and program director. From there he moved on to college and community radio and interned in commercial radio.

He earned a BA in history from St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, and also spent time studying communications, music and religion.

When he's not covering the waterfront for KPCC, Mike writes and performs with several sketch comedy groups, including the monthly late night variety show It's Past My Bedtime and weekly topical show Top Story Weekly. He's graduated from both the improv and sketch comedy programs at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre.


Stories by Mike Roe

Andrew Niccol's 'Good Kill' looks at the lives of drone operators

"It used to be, when we would go to war with a country, we'd actually go to the country," writer and director Andrew Niccol says. "That doesn't happen anymore.

Robert Cray remembers B.B. King — and how he upstaged Eric Clapton

B.B. King has passed away at 89 years old. Robert Cray, who played with him, explains what he did to make Eric Clapton ask, "What are we going to do now, Robert?"

David Letterman farewells from Jon Stewart and Tom Waits

Jon Stewart thanked Letterman for telling him "Do not confuse cancelation with failure," while Tom Waits dedicated a new song to Dave: "Take One Last Look." Watch both here.

'Mad Men': Matthew Weiner talks the show's legacy and his sense of loss

"It's up to me to maintain those relationships, and we can see each other, but we'll never be forced to go to work together every day like that, and that was amazing."

What do Ned Flanders and Mr. Burns think of Harry Shearer leaving 'The Simpsons'?

After 26 seasons of voicing dozens of characters on “The Simpsons,” Harry Shearer is leaving the show.

'Wayward Pines' showrunner: Like 'Lost' with answers and airtight logic

"There's never going to be, 'Ohhhh, there's a plot hole there, I could drive a truck through that thing.' It is absolutely airtight."

Upfronts: Colbert selfies, Supergirl rules and Miley Cyrus in pasties

Stephen Colbert wowed crowds, "Supergirl" looks great, people don't know what NBC is thinking with its Dolly Parton movie series and Miley Cyrus played Johnny Cash in pasties.

David Letterman's last shows: Tom Hanks, Bill Murray and... Eddie Vedder

Bill Murray appeared on both the first episode of Letterman's "Late Night" on NBC in 1982 and the first "Late Show" in 1993. This is appearance 44.

Upfronts: NBC courts Latinos, Spanish-language TV courts millennials

The networks are going hard after Latinos; here's your break down of efforts from Eva Longoria, Jennifer Lopez, Simon Cowell and others.

Marc Maron talks resentment and how everything could go wrong

"There's still part of me that's like, 'Why am I not Kanye?' I don't understand why I don't have that notoriety and that popularity."

Upfronts: 7 hot new shows from ABC, NBC and Fox

From old franchises like "The Muppets" (now updated to include marijuana jokes) to... a bunch of shows trying to copy other shows or using nostalgia.

'Late Late Show' bandleader Reggie Watts brings improv, chaos to 'crisp' late show model

"Part of the reason why I left 'Comedy Bang Bang,' was the hours. It was like 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., and it was just crazy."

LACMA director Michael Govan on the museum's past, present and future

The L.A. County Museum of Art is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The top item on the to-do list: raise $475 million dollars to remake the campus.

Tabitha Soren tells America's story through baseball photos

The former MTV news anchor is now an accomplished photographer with a long-in-the-making exhibit about the dreams of young baseball players.

'The D Train' delivers a big twist in a movie that almost didn't happen

The Jack Black/James Marsden movie almost fell apart at the last minute, but "The D Train" — and its big twist — became a Sundance sensation. We talked to the co-writer/directors.