Molly Peterson Environment Correspondent

Molly Peterson
Contact Molly Peterson

Molly Peterson is an award-winning environment correspondent at Southern California Public Radio.

Molly has reported, edited, directed programs, and produced stories for NPR and NPR shows including "Day to Day" and KQED's "California Report." She was a contributing producer for Nick Spitzer's weekly music program, "American Routes," and reported for "Living on Earth" in the Gulf of Mexico after Hurricanes Katrina & Rita. Prior to joining KPCC, she produced a nationally-distributed radio documentary about New Orleans called "Finding Solid Ground."

A former LA Press Club radio journalist of the year, Molly reported on the faulty pumps installed at New Orleans canals after Hurricane Katrina. That project was a finalist for an Investigative Reporters and Editors award.

Molly worked for NPR American legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg during the Clinton Impeachment.

She studied international politics at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, and graduated from UC Hastings College of the Law. She is an inactive member of the State Bar of California.

Molly was lucky enough to grow up climbing northern California trees and fishing eastern Sierra waters.


Stories by Molly Peterson

State parks get no love as Prop 21 goes down

Backers of a measure aimed at securing funding for state parks blaimed a noisy and cluttered election for the fact that Proposition 21 didn't attract enough voters. The measure would have tacked an $18 charge onto vehicle registrations, in exchange for which California-registered cars would have gotten free admission to state parks and beaches.

Environmental politics and election results

KPCC's Molly Peterson has been tracking climate policy in the U.S. Senate race, environmental politics in the Governor's race, and ballot measures of interest to the green community: Proposition 21 (the State Parks Initiative); Prop 23 (the California Jobs Initiative, which would freeze AB32 for an indefinite period of time), and Proposition 26 (which would make raising fees on polluters more challenging).

Green tech, green activists, celebrate (likely) defeat of Prop 23

Environmental groups gathered at Global Green USA headquarters in Santa Monica patted themselves on the back - in some cases, literally - for creating a coalition of environmental and business interests that together seem to have brought defeat to Proposition 23.

Just wanted to get this in under the wire

Not all of my AB 32/proposition 23 reporting made it to the radio.

Join Arnold...as he runs for his next position...to be determined

A new campaign has taken off in the waning days before the election - but it's not really for an office. Emails to Arnold Schwarzenegger's media list aren't just coming from the governor's site; they're also coming from a standalone site: JOIN ARNOLD.

Orange October! (Green World Series)

So Major League Baseball is highlighting environmental issues at the World Series this year, "thanks to a special partnership between MLB and the Natural Resources Defense Council." As a fan of the San Francisco Giants, I think they're a pretty good team to do that with.

ARB shows its cap-and-trade cards before voters play Prop 23 hand

While most of the rest of California is talking about whether to suspend or continue with AB 32, the state's Air Resources Board has released a plan about how they'd run the landmark greenhouse gas law's central program - the cap and trade program - and they're looking for public comment.

Matt Kahn's Climatopolis: of golf courses and cemeteries

Golf courses and cemeteries - the two prime wastes of real estate!Al Czervik said that. And now so does UCLA's Matt Kahn, in a way.

Check your ballots: Prop 23 language incorrect in Fresno

Some 140-thousand Fresno voters got the wrong language for a ballot measure that would pause the state's landmark greenhouse gas law - and the Yes campaign ain't happy.

Chemical-munching bacteria to make cleaner water in Riverside area

Bacteria already in the ground could clean drinking water in the Inland Empire. According to Janet Zimmerman at the Press-Enterprise, water districts are developing system whereby water is pulled from well, run past these bacteria, which eat perchlorate and nitrate and VOCs, volatile organic compounds (well, digest them), producing nitrogen gas which can get released to the atmosphere with oxygen.

North Cost MLPA a very different tale

I'm interested in the completion of the Marine Protected Areas process - under the state's MLPA law - so I've been reading up on that lately. Here in Southern California, we've got protected areas proposed and under final consideration at the state's Fish and Game Commission.

Sensors seeking sites: want a seismograph in your home?

The US Geologic Survey is looking for a few good men. Or women. Or families. If you're a dog who has wifi, a concrete slab foundation and AC power, and can read the internet, I bet you qualify too.

Dog bites man; or, Greenwashing is alive and well

My intern Captain Obvious brought to my attention a Wall Street Journal article that looks at misleading claims on green labeling. An environmental marketing company called TerraChoice issues a report that found "fibbing about or having no proof of environmental claims, vague or poorly defined marketing language, such as "all-natural," and the use of fake labels designed to imply a product has third-party certification or endorsement of its claims.

David Nahai talks to Climate Watch

My good friend, and southern California's great reporter, Ilsa Setziol, interviews David Nahai for our neighbor-to-the-north's ClimateWatch blog. You can read her interview, about watering restrictions, renewable energy, and Propposition 23/AB 32, at their site.

Proposition 26, Part 2: the money [UPDATED]

Okay, to refresh your memory, here's the argument the Yes on 26 people make: according to the president of California's Chamber of Commerce -