Molly Peterson Environment Correspondent

Molly Peterson
Contact Molly Peterson

Molly Peterson is an award-winning environment correspondent at Southern California Public Radio.

Molly has reported, edited, directed programs, and produced stories for NPR and NPR shows including "Day to Day" and KQED's "California Report." She was a contributing producer for Nick Spitzer's weekly music program, "American Routes," and reported for "Living on Earth" in the Gulf of Mexico after Hurricanes Katrina & Rita. Prior to joining KPCC, she produced a nationally-distributed radio documentary about New Orleans called "Finding Solid Ground."

A former LA Press Club radio journalist of the year, Molly reported on the faulty pumps installed at New Orleans canals after Hurricane Katrina. That project was a finalist for an Investigative Reporters and Editors award.

Molly worked for NPR American legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg during the Clinton Impeachment.

She studied international politics at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, and graduated from UC Hastings College of the Law. She is an inactive member of the State Bar of California.

Molly was lucky enough to grow up climbing northern California trees and fishing eastern Sierra waters.


Stories by Molly Peterson

Quick programming note: Clean water at the 'bu

Just a quick note that some well-informed local realtors asked for a quick update on Malibu's water quality issues. You can read my brief history of those issues at their site on this link.

What's all this 10/10/10 stuff anyway?

Climate activists love their numbers. They catch the media's attention. But for the uninitiated, they may not have much of a meaning. Here's a primer.

Proposition 23: campaign finance update [UPDATED]

If it's Friday night, it's time for campaign finance numbers. (Really?)

Is DWP backing away from residential rooftop solar?

Renewable energy advocates are concerned that the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's consideration this week of modifications to its solar incentive program signals a retreat from solar entirely.

New Yorker takes on new climate stakes for US, California

Ryan Lizza's article about how climate and energy legislation, despite having support across the aisle and from environmentalists and from polluters, still managed to die an ignominious death in Congress is a fascinating read.

Runoff rules the Bay Area: another California region makes runoff rules

As a former frequent kayaker of the San Francisco Bay, I was surprised to read that maybe agriculture from the Delta isn't primarily to blame for elevated levels of mercury and other pollutants in those waters.

Plastic bag bans, taxes moving in U.S. cities, if not in California

Sam Mendes might find that a plastic bag provokes an unexpected emotional reaction - finding the miraculous in the mundane, as the character Ricky does in American Beauty - but more and more cities might not agree.

How much water are you using at home?

With the news that utility bills are evidence in a case where Councilman Richard Alarcon's residency will figure prominently, it seems Angelenos and anyone wishing to convey an airtight impression they live in a place are in need of more information about water use.

Slow Pacific Swell: how we re-named this blog

I'm rarely good at picking keepers in my fantasy leagues (which, come to think of it, we rarely do), so it's hard to imagine I'm much better at choosing a blog name. Siel, however, is clever, and she & I kicked around a bunch of ideas.

Splittail re-review re-completed for Delta

The federal Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that the Sacramento splittail fish doesn't get protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Solar gets a go on federal public land in California [UPDATED]

Jazzfest in New Orleans was where I first really became acquainted with the phenomenon of playing the star on stage. The drummer would tap his sticks, the backing band would start, and eventually Ray Charles or Allen Toussaint would amble into position.

Fish & Game grants more time for MLPA comments

Surfers, kayakers, spearfishermen, beachgoers, scientists, cities, charter boat operators, and anyone else you can think of: coastal resource users between Santa Barbara and the Mexican border have got more time to comment on the state of California's Marine Life Protection Act - 15 more days in fact.

UC Irvine researchers see the sea, and more of it, in satellite images

A team of scientists - led by researchers at UC Irvine - has made new estimations of sea level rise from freshwater flowing into the world's oceans.

Check your bucket: climate changes could widen Lake Mead's bathtub ring

Seen Lake Mead lately? The bathtub ring - what locals call the white walls of the canyon covered with mineral deposits - keeps growing taller. If UCLA researchers are right, a confluence of natural circumstances will continue to make the bathtub ring grow - and that spells trouble for states that depend on Colorado River water.

Brown argues environment could create jobs in second debate of governor's race

Not too much talk about the environment in today's debate between Jerry Brown and Meg Whitman in California's governor's race. What talking there was, Brown did it. In answer to a question about job creation in California that pointed out higher unemployment for Latinos, Brown responded that 1.