Molly Peterson Environment Correspondent

Molly Peterson
Contact Molly Peterson

Molly Peterson is an award-winning environment correspondent at Southern California Public Radio.

Molly has reported, edited, directed programs, and produced stories for NPR and NPR shows including "Day to Day" and KQED's "California Report." She was a contributing producer for Nick Spitzer's weekly music program, "American Routes," and reported for "Living on Earth" in the Gulf of Mexico after Hurricanes Katrina & Rita. Prior to joining KPCC, she produced a nationally-distributed radio documentary about New Orleans called "Finding Solid Ground."

A former LA Press Club radio journalist of the year, Molly reported on the faulty pumps installed at New Orleans canals after Hurricane Katrina. That project was a finalist for an Investigative Reporters and Editors award.

Molly worked for NPR American legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg during the Clinton Impeachment.

She studied international politics at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, and graduated from UC Hastings College of the Law. She is an inactive member of the State Bar of California.

Molly was lucky enough to grow up climbing northern California trees and fishing eastern Sierra waters.


Stories by Molly Peterson

Latest Santa Monica Bay report cites better water quality monitoring

A state commission tasked with improving the waters off Santa Monica and the South Bay coastline finds some key habitats protected and some beaches safer for swimming. KPCC's Molly Peterson reports that for those silver linings, the group's findings include some lingering clouds.

FDA flexes on BPA, says the chemical causes some concern

Still no ban, but after significant consumer and environmental-group pressure, and numerous public hearings, the federal Food and Drug Administration is issuing new guidelines for Bisphenol A.

Haiti recovery essentials: water, medical supplies...and cell phones?

On my way back to our downtown bureau from our soon-to-be-new-building, I heard really interesting stories today from The World: first, Matthew Bell reports on the pressing need for water in Haiti: water purification systems and tablets so that people can carry water home in plastic jugs (they don't get to worry about what kind of plastic that is, this week).

Sittin' on the dock of the bay...monitoring its pollutants

Every five years, just like with the European Union commission presidency, the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission updates its State of the Bay. What is that state, you ask? Better than last time, still got problems, got some new stuff going on.

Schoolin' kids in the environment, California style

California just got its first environmental education curriculum. I'm related to a lot of people who teach (though the sort of things they teach have rhyme and scan, as opposed to kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus or species), so I checked it out.

New deputy mayor Austin Beutner...has a lot to do

KPCC's correspondent and man-about-town Frank Stoltze is covering this announcement. But I'm interested by the release from the mayor's office, which notes that the new deputy mayor and jobs chief "will be given a large portfolio with unprecedented oversight of City resources beginning with a direct line of authority over the Department of Water and Power (DWP), the Port of Los Angeles, and economic development and business policy issues at the Los Angeles World Airports.

Cap and trade revenues should mostly go to public, committee says

A group of academics, business representatives and officials recommends that most economic benefits from the state's carbon trading scheme should go to consumers in the future. KPCC's Molly Peterson has the story.

Long-planned Green Path North no longer on the DWP's path to renewable goals

Desert activists are marginally happier now, thanks to a little noticed action the DWP board of commissioners took last Tuesday. The board passed an amendment to the 2009-2010 budget; you can read it here.

Methane seeps in Santa Barbara, rising gas in Russia: could it sink the atmosphere?

Seeps in Santa Barbara aren't just about tarballs - and seeps aren't just in Santa Barbara. They matter to surfers as well as climate scientists.

Tranquillon Ridge oil drilling could be resurrected by governor's budget

A hotly-debated proposal to allow new drilling off of Santa Barbara’s coast is resurrected in the governor’s latest budget proposal. KPCC’s Molly Peterson has details.

Three small things about three small pieces of one complicated state budget

The biggest lightning rod on my beat in the new proposed budget 2: electric boogaloo is the idea to take back $140 million in General Fund dough from State Parks and replace it with revenues from drilling on Tranquillon Ridge.

The race is not to the Swift, at the port

In the gully of time between Xmas and New years, when I did a series on what makes a home sustainable, another interesting piece fell into the port puzzle. an administrative law judge ruled on the legality of firing four workers from Swift transportation.

As the port turns...

After a while, the port's environmental issues can seem like a soap opera to a daily reporter. (Anyone else have a mom who loved Lucinda Walsh?) On Monday, the Port of Long Beach took the opportunity presented by the first Monday of 2010 to tout last year's clean trucks success, and this year's stricter rules.

Frak! Salazar tightens up oil and gas drilling on BLM land

I start no new year without regrets, and a (sure, yes, small) one has been that I didn't have a chance to write about western oil and gas drilling last year. I was given a screener for a documentary called Split Estate, and it was a fascinating look at something I had learned during law school, but never seen in practice: property owners who have "split the estate" such that mineral rights are owned by someone who is extracting them, and the surface rights are owned by someone who works or lives on the land.

At California Resources agency, Chrisman out, Lester Snow may be in

The longtime head of the state's Resources Agency — a close advisor to Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger — will step down at the start of next month.