Monica Bushman Associate Producer, Take Two

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Contact Monica Bushman

Monica Bushman is an Associate Producer on KPCC's Take Two program.

Prior to that, she worked on KPCC's local broadcast of Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Monica began her career in radio as a producer for PRI's "America Abroad" in Washington, DC. Before coming to KPCC, she worked on various NPR shows including "Talk of the Nation" and "Morning Edition."

Monica is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and a native of Anaheim, California.​


Stories by Monica Bushman

'War Machine' uses satire to cast a critical eye on the war in Afghanistan

What does a war movie look like in the Trump Era? One of the first is “War Machine” from Australian writer/director David Michod.

Manchester: Why music matters to girls and why girls matter to music

Following the Manchester bombing, NPR music critic Ann Powers wrote, "Young girls loving music, whatever kind of music, are truth. I believe in them and nothing can annihilate their truth."

How teaching English in China led 'The Wall' screenwriter to big break

Dwain Worrell was teaching English in China when he submitted a screenplay through Amazon's open submission site. Weeks later he was headed back to the US with a movie deal in hand.

What 'Actually' is sexual assault? A new play explores the question of consent

Anna Ziegler's play "Actually" delves deeply into the murky territory that often surrounds the he-said, she-said accounts of a reported sexual assault.

Did Conan O'Brien steal a joke about 'shrinkage'? It may be up to a jury to decide

Tom Brady and a Washington Monument penis joke figure prominently in a joke theft accusation that may land Conan O'Brien in court.

At age 80, Eleanor Coppola caught 'the family virus' — a love of narrative filmmaking

As the wife of famed director Francis Ford Coppola, Eleanor Coppola largely set aside her own creative ambitions for years. Now she's made her first feature film at age 80.

Summer 2017 movies: Beyond 'Pirates,' 'Apes,' and 'Transformers'

The 2017 summer movie season will be dominated by sequels, but there are also plenty of promising original films to watch out for too.

John Oliver reprises his role in the revived net neutrality debate

In 2014, Oliver rallied his viewers to contact the Federal Communications Commission in support of net neutrality. With the new FCC head looking to roll back regulations, Oliver is back at it.

'Dear White People' creator Justin Simien on popping the 'post-racial bubble'

The new Netflix series uses satirical, self-referential comedy to address touchy topics like race, politics and sexuality.

Writers ponder their fates as contract deadline looms

If an agreement isn’t reached by midnight tonight, or if talks aren’t extended, thousands of writers are expected to go on strike immediately.

Roger Guenveur Smith's one-man show takes a closer look at Rodney King's life and legacy

With his fiery play titled simply “Rodney King,” actor and playwright Roger Guenveur Smith places the beating of Rodney King in a broader cultural context.

Filmmaker John Waters on 'Making Trouble,' the NEA, and bad reviews

The filmmaker has some advice for young artists: go out into the world and make trouble from the inside.

'Casting JonBenet' is a new twist on the documentary format

There have been TV movies, documentaries and docudramas made about the case, but the Netflix documentary, "Casting JonBenet," is something quite different.

Kendrick Lamar goes deep into religious symbolism with 'Damn'

Religion, redemption and reconciliation are among the many themes running through the rapper's new album 'Damn.'

John Ridley's LA Riots doc is meant to 'break hearts and lift spirits'

John Ridley's documentary, "Let it Fall: Los Angeles 1982-1992," marks the 25 year anniversary of the 1992 L.A. Riots. He says a goal of the film was to "break hearts and lift spirits."