Paul Glickman Senior Editor, Health Care & Investigative

Paul Glickman
Contact Paul Glickman

Paul Glickman served as KPCC’s first News Director, from 2000 to 2012. In 2012, he stepped into his new role as Sr. Editor, Health Care and Investigative.

Paul worked for many years as a radio and print reporter in California, Central America, and Washington, D.C. In the mid-1980s he was based in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, an excellent vantage point for covering two neighboring wars: the conflict in El Salvador, where the U.S.-backed government fought Cuban-backed guerrillas, and the war in Nicaragua, where the Cuban-backed government fought U.S.-backed guerrillas.

In the 1990s Glickman was a foreign editor at National Public Radio, overseeing the network's coverage of such historic events as the Rwandan genocide and South Africa's transition from apartheid to democracy.

An L.A. native, Glickman grew up in Gardena and Sherman Oaks. He lives in Sherman Oaks with his wife Janetta and their sons Jonah and Caleb.


Stories by Paul Glickman

Behavior modification might curb antibiotic overprescribing

A USC-led study finds comparing providers' prescription rates with peers and requiring written justification both led to fewer inappropriate drug orders.

Olympus recalls medical scope linked to 'superbug' infections

The move comes two days after a sharply critical report from the Senate Health Committee.

Thousands attend memorial for San Bernardino victims

The Dec. 2 attack that left 14 dead and 22 wounded brought out "the very best in our characters ... We showed the world that ... we are San Bernardino strong,"

FDA eases restrictions on blood donations from gay men

But the new policy still bars donations from men who have had sex with a man in the previous year. Gay rights activists criticize the restriction.

Calif. stem cell agency approves 5-year strategic plan

The plan calls for accelerating the agency's development of potential stem cell therapies.

San Bernardino attack renews SoCal Muslims' anxieties

The massacre carried out by a Muslim man and his wife has forced Muslims to once again contend with the stereotype that Islam condones terrorism.

Prenatal vaccination means less severe whooping cough, study says

State study finds stricken babies whose moms did not get the Tdap during pregnancy are more likely to be hospitalized, end up in the ICU and require intubation.

Court rules McDade shooting report must be released

A state appellate court rejects the Pasadena police union's effort to keep the independent report on the fatal shooting of Kendrec McDade secret.

Fullerton settles election suit, voters to decide on district-based system (updated)

The suit claimed the city's at-large system denied Asian-Americans the ability to elect candidates of their choice. A district-based plan will go on the November 2016 ballot.

FAQ: What does Blue Shield losing its tax-exempt status mean for consumers?

The insurer is fighting the state's decision to revoke its tax-exempt status. We offer a few answers to what that might mean for Blue Shield's 3.4 million California customers.

Bill closing sexual consent loophole heads to Gov. Brown's desk

Sen. Ricardo Lara introduced SB 14 after KPCC revealed a loophole that allows defendants in civil cases to argue that minors can consent to sex with adults.

City of Davis requires milk or water with kids' meals

First 5 Yolo, the nonprofit that pushed for the law, believes it's the first of its kind. There have been similar moves in the private sector.

Calif. Medical Association drops opposition to assisted suicide

Reversing a nearly 30-year old policy, the state's medical lobby says it is now neutral on a bill that would legalize physician-assisted suicide.

War deployment did not increase vets' suicide risk, study says

The study in JAMA Psychiatry found that soldiers deployed to the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan did not have a higher rate of suicide compared with those who did not deploy.

NARAL claims 'crisis pregnancy centers' are anti-abortion fronts

California NARAL report echoes charges in the group's national report. The head of a large pregnancy center network calls national report "an attack on the truth."