Paul Glickman Senior Editor, Health Care & Investigative

Paul Glickman
Contact Paul Glickman

Paul Glickman served as KPCC’s first News Director, from 2000 to 2012. In 2012, he stepped into his new role as Sr. Editor, Health Care and Investigative.

Paul worked for many years as a radio and print reporter in California, Central America, and Washington, D.C. In the mid-1980s he was based in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, an excellent vantage point for covering two neighboring wars: the conflict in El Salvador, where the U.S.-backed government fought Cuban-backed guerrillas, and the war in Nicaragua, where the Cuban-backed government fought U.S.-backed guerrillas.

In the 1990s Glickman was a foreign editor at National Public Radio, overseeing the network's coverage of such historic events as the Rwandan genocide and South Africa's transition from apartheid to democracy.

An L.A. native, Glickman grew up in Gardena and Sherman Oaks. He lives in Sherman Oaks with his wife Janetta and their sons Jonah and Caleb.


Stories by Paul Glickman

Brown's budget calls for build-up of rainy day fund

Gov. Jerry Brown prepares to announce his budget proposal Tuesday against a backdrop of lower state revenues and threats of federal funding cuts.

Why are a handful of measles cases an 'outbreak'?

L.A. County's public health department considers the nine confirmed measles cases to be an outbreak because there were more than expected and they are linked.

Judge rejects pollution cleanup order against Paramount firm

L.A. County and the South Coast Air Quality Management District had sought an order directing Anaplex Corp. to immediately curb hexavalent chromium emissions.

Covered California pushes deadline another 2 days

The state health insurance exchange says it's making the move to align with the newly-announced midnight Monday deadline for states using federal exchanges.

The plan to clean 50 Exide homes per week

The Department of Toxic Substances Control's draft plan says the effort to remove lead from some 2,500 homes near Exide would start next summer.

New urgency to legalize LA street vendors

Fear of mass deportations has added urgency to the effort. A key city council panel is set to vote Monday on a legalization plan. Vendors object to some elements.

South LA companies emitting high levels of chromium 6

The AQMD names two metal processing companies as sources of dangerously high emissions of the carcinogen. It says other firms are guilty of the same violation.

Anaheim dental clinic cleared to use its water again

More than 50 kids who underwent partial root canals at Children's Dental Group of Anaheim developed bacterial infections. It has replaced its water system.

LA, Gardens Regional Hospital settle patient 'dumping' case

The hospital denies any wrongdoing, says it only settled because it's in bankruptcy, and accuses L.A. City Attorney Mike Feuer of "political grandstanding."

2 LA Supes criticize industry's drug take-back efforts

Drug industry trade groups unveil a public education campaign focused on take-back events and locations. Supervisors Kuehl and Solis say the effort falls short.

LA County eyes private firm for care of mentally ill inmates

On Tuesday the Board of Supervisors is set to vote on a motion to contract with a private firm to expand care for medium-security inmates with serious mental illness.

Seeking solutions to the Sunshine Canyon stench

Supervisor Antonovich's motion would direct three county departments to explore what can be done about the huge landfill's bad smells.

LA County sues SoCal Gas over shut-off valves

In the wake of the massive Porter Ranch gas leak, the county seeks to force the company to install underground shut-off valves on all of its wells.

California makes vaccines mandatory — which side are you on?

California’s new law requiring almost all children entering daycare, kindergarten or seventh grade to be vaccinated against various diseases took effect Friday.

SoCal trauma centers: No surge in July 4th fireworks injuries

At least three Southern Californians suffered severe hand injuries, but several regional trauma centers saw just a handful of people hurt by fireworks.