Paul Glickman Senior Editor, Health Care & Investigative

Paul Glickman
Contact Paul Glickman

Paul Glickman served as KPCC’s first News Director, from 2000 to 2012. In 2012, he stepped into his new role as Sr. Editor, Health Care and Investigative.

Paul worked for many years as a radio and print reporter in California, Central America, and Washington, D.C. In the mid-1980s he was based in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, an excellent vantage point for covering two neighboring wars: the conflict in El Salvador, where the U.S.-backed government fought Cuban-backed guerrillas, and the war in Nicaragua, where the Cuban-backed government fought U.S.-backed guerrillas.

In the 1990s Glickman was a foreign editor at National Public Radio, overseeing the network's coverage of such historic events as the Rwandan genocide and South Africa's transition from apartheid to democracy.

An L.A. native, Glickman grew up in Gardena and Sherman Oaks. He lives in Sherman Oaks with his wife Janetta and their sons Jonah and Caleb.


Stories by Paul Glickman

FAQ: What does Blue Shield losing its tax-exempt status mean for consumers?

The insurer is fighting the state's decision to revoke its tax-exempt status. We offer a few answers to what that might mean for Blue Shield's 3.4 million California customers.

Bill closing sexual consent loophole heads to Gov. Brown's desk

Sen. Ricardo Lara introduced SB 14 after KPCC revealed a loophole that allows defendants in civil cases to argue that minors can consent to sex with adults.

City of Davis requires milk or water with kids' meals

First 5 Yolo, the nonprofit that pushed for the law, believes it's the first of its kind. There have been similar moves in the private sector.

Calif. Medical Association drops opposition to assisted suicide

Reversing a nearly 30-year old policy, the state's medical lobby says it is now neutral on a bill that would legalize physician-assisted suicide.

War deployment did not increase vets' suicide risk, study says

The study in JAMA Psychiatry found that soldiers deployed to the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan did not have a higher rate of suicide compared with those who did not deploy.

NARAL claims 'crisis pregnancy centers' are anti-abortion fronts

California NARAL report echoes charges in the group's national report. The head of a large pregnancy center network calls national report "an attack on the truth."

Would you support efforts to ditch Calif's 'personal' vaccine exemption?

Lawmakers plan to introduce a bill that would repeal the Personal Belief Exemption, backed by State Senators Richard Pan (D-Sacramento) and Ben Allen (D-Santa Monica).

Covered California: Health plan subsidies averaged $5K+ in 2014

The state health insurance exchange says about 800,000 households benefited from the federal support when buying coverage for 2014.

Disney measles cases now stand at 26

Those who got sick visited Disneyland or California Adventure between Dec. 15-20. Six had to be hospitalized, and at least 12 were unvaccinated.

Orange County confirms 3 more Disneyland measles cases (updated)

That brings the number of people infected at Disneyland or California Adventure between Dec. 15-20 to 17.

FDA calls for end of ban on gay men donating blood

The agency's proposed rule change would still require men who have sex with men to wait one year "since the last sexual contact" to donate blood.

KPCC report on LAUSD sex abuse suit sparks 3 bills

Two state senators and an assemblywoman write bills that would bar lawyers in civil cases from arguing that a child can consent to sex with an adult.

Feds arrest former Ventura surgeon, claim unnecessary surgeries, fraud

The Department of Justice had already filed a civil suit against Dr. Aria Sabit over the same allegations. California stripped him of his license in August.

$140M settlement in Miramonte civil suit against LAUSD [updated]

The case involved dozens of students suing L.A. Unified over its handling of the Mark Berndt sex abuse case. It is the largest payout ever for LAUSD.

LAUSD takes away 14 cases from law firm after remarks on lawsuit

W. Keith Wyatt had come under fire for saying that a child's decision to cross a busy street is as dangerous as deciding to have sex with a teacher.