Paul Glickman Managing Editor, Investigative & Projects

Paul Glickman
Contact Paul Glickman

Paul Glickman served as KPCC’s first News Director, from 2000 to 2012. In 2012, he stepped into his new role as Managing Editor, Investigative & Projects. He now oversees the station’s investigative coverage and special projects, along with some beat reporters.

Paul worked for many years as a radio and print reporter in California, Central America, and Washington, D.C. In the mid-1980s he was based in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, an excellent vantage point for covering two neighboring wars: the conflict in El Salvador, where the U.S.-backed government fought Cuban-backed guerrillas, and the war in Nicaragua, where the Cuban-backed government fought U.S.-backed guerrillas.

In the 1990s Glickman was a foreign editor at National Public Radio, overseeing the network's coverage of such historic events as the Rwandan genocide and South Africa's transition from apartheid to democracy.

An L.A. native, Glickman grew up in Gardena and Sherman Oaks. He lives in Sherman Oaks with his wife Janetta and their sons Jonah and Caleb.


Stories by Paul Glickman

State offers health insurance sign up 'grace period'

Covered California is offering the "grace period" for those who can not sign up because of technical problems or long wait times online or at call centers.

Covered California sends out thousands of corrected letters

Covered California sent out letters with inaccurate information to nearly 114,000 insurance applicants. Corrected letters are 'on their way out the door.'

Obamacare: White House shift on cancelled plans will apply in California

Covered California's chief says those with cancelled individual plans can buy catastrophic policies, while arguing that they are not 'a good value.'

California mulls whether to adopt White House shift on cancelled policies

The White House is letting those whose individual policies were cancelled buy catastrophic insurance. Covered California is "assessing" the change.

Covered California: Some October enrollment data were wrong

Covered California says it mistakenly transposed categories in reporting how many enrolled with federal subsidies, and how many enrolled without a subsidy.

Some new Covered California enrollment data raise questions

If numbers released Thursday are correct, then November saw a net loss of more than 10,000 people enrolling in unsubsidized health plans.

Covered California: 4 of 5 state doctors are in our plans

Covered California claims more than 58,000 California doctors and more than 360 hospitals are included in its health insurance plans.

Enrollment jumps at Covered California, though national totals still lag

As of Nov. 30, more than 107,000 people obtained insurance through Covered California. Another 137,000 got coverage through HealthCare.gov.

LA County asks mediator to try to end social worker strike

The strike has caused a "disruption," but the county insists there have not been "major impacts" on the delivery of services.

Covered California rejects Obama call for health plan extensions

The board of directors vote 5 to 0 to retain current policy. They fear that extending current plans that don't comply with the ACA will lead to higher costs overall.

Gov. Brown signs bill enforcing transparency on Maywood water firms

The governor forces Maywood's three private water firms to comply with open meeting and records laws, but slashes amount for cleanup of the city's water.

DWP and Great Basin settle dispute over dust control on part of Owens Lake

The DWP can use a thinner layer of gravel and 'brine flooding' to reduce the use of water for dust control. A Native American massacre site is protected.

Santa Monica shooting: Franco family struck by a second tragedy

The loss of Carlos and his daughter Marcela leaves "a hole that will never be filled." The family asks for donations to be able to bury them with "dignity" and "honor."

UCLA gets federal grant to fast-track autism drug experiments

The NIH is giving UCLA $9 million to create a national network of research centers that will assess within weeks, rather than years, an autism drug's potential.

Superior Court judge rejects settlement in 1-800-GET-THIN suit

Superior Court Judge Kenneth Freeman is not convinced the proposed $500,000 payout to the estimated 11,000 plaintiffs in the class action suit is sufficient.