Rina Palta Correspondent

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Contact Rina Palta

Rina Palta is a Correspondent for KPCC, covering Southern California's social safety net.

Prior to that, Rina was a news editor for the station. She also covered crime and public safety as a reporter, looking at the systems designed to help people who fall into poverty, social welfare, public mental health systems, or criminal justice system — and help many get back on their feet.

Rina came to L.A. from the Bay Area, where she launched the Informant, a digital collaboration between NPR and KALW. Her reporting there focused on California's prison, jails, and law enforcement agencies, and the effect of crime and the criminal justice system on communities.

Palta is a graduate of Haverford College and UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. In her spare time, she's a world-class eater and aspiring surfer.


Stories by Rina Palta

LA voters may be asked to help the homeless — by raising taxes

L.A. County, looking for millions of dollars to fund its plan to eradicate homelessness, will likely turn to voters for a way to raise the cash.

LA voted to fund housing for homeless. Now what?

Voters in the city of L.A. approved a bond measure that will invest $1.2 billion to build new housing for the city's homeless. That's a first step, officials say.

Homeless funding may ride on who wins LA County supervisors race

Whoever wins the two seats on the power LA County Board of Supervisors could provide critical vote on funding a homelessness fix.

LA sees increase in people not competent to stand trial

The number of defendants declared "incompetent to stand trial" due to mental illness on pace to hit 4500 this year. That's up from about 3500 last year.

LA wants a new unit in the jails to root out extremism

L.A. County is looking to beef up its apparatus for countering violent extremism by creating a unit to identify radicals behind bars.

LA County Fire sees massive bump in calls for medical care

L.A. County Fire Department paramedics are exhausted after seeing a 32 percent increase in calls for emergency medical care over the past three years.

LA sheriff: Don't arrest homeless, get them into services

Under a new county policy, homeless people who commit low-level crimes will be directed to shelters and mental health services. Arrests will be a last resort.

Social workers investigated family of dead Echo Park boy 6 times

An 11-year-old boy found dead in his mother's closet last week had been the subject of multiple reports to child welfare authorities.

Psychotropic drugs for foster kids need oversight, report says

The state's auditor has found some foster kids in California are receiving high doses of psychotropic medications, without court approval.

LA's Skid Row shelters overwhelmed with women and families

More women and families are showing up on their doorsteps of homeless shelters on Skid Row. Advocates say many are fleeing domestic violence.

Facing prison, former Sheriff Baca discloses he has Alzheimer's

Federal prosecutors want former L.A. Sheriff Lee Baca to serve six months in prison. Defense attorneys argue his Alzheimer's and reformer legacy warrant a lighter sentence.

LAPD not justified in killing homeless man

Police Chief Charlie Beck had already recommended criminal charges for the officer who fatally shot 29-year-old Brendon Glenn. The Police Commission agreed with him.

Former Undersheriff Paul Tanaka guilty of obstruction, conspiracy

Tanaka faces up to 15 years in prison for participating in a cover-up meant to derail an FBI investigation into the sheriff's department.

LAPD commissioners suggest rules changes for use of force

The recommendations would change how police are trained to use deadly force in L.A.—and how the LAPD investigates and reviews incidents like officer-involved shootings.

Coachella trailer park with sewage problem to get overhaul

A Coachella Valley trailer park adopted by UC Irvine law students because of its distressed state is slated to get a new sewage system, thanks to a state grant.