Rina Palta Crime and Safety Reporter

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Contact Rina Palta

Rina Palta is a Crime and Safety Reporter for KPCC.

Rina spent the past few years reporting on California's prisons, jails, and law enforcement agencies, focusing on how crime and the criminal justice system impact communities. She comes to Southern California from the Bay Area, where she launched the Informant, a digital collaboration between NPR and KALW. Her reporting there on juvenile justice earned a PASS Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency.

Palta is a graduate of Haverford College and UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. In her spare time, she's a world-class eater and aspiring surfer.


Stories by Rina Palta

LA's jails at their most crowded in years

L.A.'s jails are experiencing their highest population numbers in years – a result, officials say, of the state's prison realignment law.

LA County approves drawing up plans for new women's jail

The Board of Supervisors took a significant step Tuesday towards constructing a new women's jail in Lancaster using state funds. Critics urged supervisors to look at alternatives.

LA County supervisors to get access to deputy shooting files

The board's efforts to oversee the sheriff's department continued with a process for requesting the files of deputies involved in shootings. Supervisors said it's needed to help evaluate potential payouts.

Los Angeles inmate still missing in rare jail escape

The 37-year old Christopher Lee Brown had just been sentenced to four years in jail for burglary and identity theft when he walked out of jail in downtown L.A.

Why for-profit prisons house more inmates of color

A recent study found that the populations of for-profit prisons tend to be younger, which correlates with a skew toward more black and Latino inmates than in publicly-run prisons.

Second strikers flooding California's prison system

Offenders convicted of second strikes under California's "Three Strikes" law are flooding the prison system, according to state officials.

LA County supervisor wants more info on deputy shootings

L.A. County Supervisor Gloria Molina believes the Board of Supervisors should have more access to deputy-involved shooting investigations – part of an ongoing effort to keep tabs on the sheriff's department.

Lack of interpreters among the barriers to justice in California

When talking about language diversity in California, most think Spanish. But Californians speak over 200 languages β€” and courts need translators.

Ruling could mean more murderers paroled in California

A federal judge recently struck down portions of two tough-on-crime ballot initiatives that hampered the ability of prisoners to be paroled. The decision could lead to the release of many serious felons.

Cops on horses: Old-fashioned police technique in a modern age

In the 1800s, horse-mounted police officers galloped the countryside of a rural America, chasing cattle rustlers. Today, they are more likely seen in parks and during riots.

LA County Probation finds flaws in electronic monitoring

Management issues and a failure to hold an outside vendor accountable led to serious flaws in a program that monitors offenders in Los Angeles County.

LA County to study civilian oversight of Sheriff's Department

The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to study creating a civilian body to monitor the L.A. County Sheriff's Department. But it may not have any real power.

2 plead guilty in beating of Bryan Stow at Dodger Stadium (updated)

Louie Sanchez, 31, and Marvin Norwood, 32, were sentenced to eight years and four years in prison respectively. Stow is still recovering from the beating at his Santa Cruz home.

Analysts question jail building proposal, predict further cuts

The LAO, which provides recommendations to the state legislature, released a review Wednesday of Brown's criminal justice proposals, totaling $14.1 billion. Read the full report.

Supervisors approve $1.85M payout in shooting of mentally ill woman

In 2012, an L.A. County Sheriff's deputy shot a woman who was wielding a hammer at a mental health facility. It led to changes on how deputies are trained to deal with people in a mental health crisis.