Stephanie O'Neill Health Care Correspondent

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Stephanie O’Neill is the Health Care Correspondent for Southern California Public Radio. Her multi-platform journalism career includes reporting for public radio, public television and newspapers, including three years as a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, four years as a staff reporter/columnist for the Contra Costa Times and two years as the first Los Angeles Bureau Chief for KQED’s statewide radio magazine, the "California Report.” She’s also been published in national magazines, including Columbia Journalism Review, New York Lawyer Magazine and Consumer Reports publications.

Prior to joining Southern California Public Radio, Stephanie produced hundreds of feature stories and breaking news reports that aired on NPR, Marketplace, Monitor Radio, AP Radio, the BBC and CBS Radio’s "The Osgood File." Her coverage has included environmental, legal and political features as well as reports on the 1992 L.A. Riot, the OJ Simpson criminal/civil trials and many of California’s largest earthquakes, floods and fires.

Stephanie's work has won awards from the Associated Press Television and Radio Association, the Los Angeles Press Club and the San Francisco Peninsula Press Club. She is a 2014 NPR-Kaiser Health News Fellow and a 2013-2014 Fellow of the Regional Health Journalism Program conducted by the Association of Health Care Journalists.

Stephanie earned a law degree from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles and a B.A. In Political Science/Public Policy from the University of California, Davis.

Away from work, Stephanie enjoys riding her horses, hiking with her dogs and hanging out with her human friends and family.


Stories by Stephanie O'Neill

TB outbreak on skid row is old news to health officials

County health officials ask for state and federal assistance to deal with six-year-old TB "outbreak."

SoCal scientists fear the effect of sequestration cuts on medical research

California scientists are concerned about losing funding for important research projects as budget cuts tied to the sequestration looms.

SoCal scientists fear the effect of sequestration cuts on medical research

California scientists are concerned about losing funding for important research projects as budget cuts tied to the sequestration looms.

Why zits happen - and why sometimes they don't

Why do some people suffer from zits and others don't? UCLA researchers may know why.

Automatic federal spending cuts will hit California health care

Automatic spending cuts, known as sequestration, will hit California medical research and public health

UC policy experts and health care industry leaders announce plan for better health care at lower cost

UC policy experts and health care industry leaders announce plan that offers more Californians better health care at lower cost

Low-protein diet may slow the advance of Alzheimer's

USC study finds protein-restricted diet appears to slow dementia and improve memory in mice.

Being in love is good for your heart, cardiologists say

Just in time for Valentine's Day: cardiologists say that being in love is literally good for your heart. They say it boosts cardiovascular health.

STUDY: Researchers able to block HIV virus in some mice

A UCLA study found an enzyme that can permeate a cell’s wall and potentially block deadly viruses from entering it. The finding could lead to new anti-viral drugs.

Vascular brain injury may play a role in dementia

UC Davis study finds vascular brain injury may play a far more significant role than toxic brain plaques in the development of Alzheimer's and other dementias.

LAPD manhunt: 50 officers still searching for Dorner in mountains

Christopher Dorner may be familiar with the Big Bear area in San Bernardino Co. Records show his mother owns a two-acre parcel of land there.

Preteen vaccination week observed statewide

Health officials urge parent of California middle school students to get them vaccinated during "Preteen Vaccine Week," which begins on Sunday.

Living in Orange County may be good for your health

Life expectancy of Orange County residents lengthens by 5 years since 1990, higher than California and national averages.

VIDEO: 'Go Red For Women' campaign: Heart disease kills 1 woman every minute

Cardiovascular disease kills more women than all cancers combined, says the American Heart Associations Go Red For Women campaign.

Flu season at its peak across Southern California

In Los Angeles County, the department of public health is reporting that the flu has killed four residents, all of whom were 65 years and older. Other counties have also reported deaths.