Arts & Entertainment

'Blurred Lines' trial: Hit song made almost $17 million

Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke profited greatly from the 2013 hit song "Blurred Lines," which is at the center of a courtroom battle nearing its end.

Composer Jake Heggie on the long life of 'Dead Man Walking'

On the eve of its L.A. premiere, the opera's composer reveals the reasons why the opera he wrote 15 years ago is still so powerful and resonant.

Ferguson, fire, Mexico unrest ignite LA artist’s creativity

Images of fire, protests and tear gas from Ferguson, Mexico City, and downtown L.A. have landed in the inbox of L.A. painter Sandy Rodriguez.

'Hip Hop Family Tree': Comic book artist Ed Piskor inks a history of rap

Ed Piskor talks about what he learned during his research for the series, how Robert Crumb influenced his project, and what hip-hop heavyweights think about his work.

Diversity among TV writers is down from previous years

The Writers Guild of America, West examined the 2013-2014 TV season and found there was a drop in women and minority writers on scripted shows.

Anything goes at The Comedy Store's Roast Battle

In a twist on the TV staple, a bunch of brave and mostly unknown comics are taking the comedy roast to new highs and lows.

Valiant CEO wants to 'simply just make great comics'

How the biggest threat to Marvel and DC faded into obscurity, only to be revived by an obsessive fan who gave new life to the brand and its unique characters.

3 TV shows with upbeat, optimistic messages you should be watching

Margaret Lyons, who writes about television for Vulture.com, highlights some shows that are an alternative to much of today's fare.

'The Fade Out': Ed Brubaker on Hollywood in the 1940s

The graphic novelist heard stories from his screenwriter uncle about Hollywood in the noir era, which inspired his popular series.

Conan O'Brien in Cuba: 'All I want to do is try and make these people laugh'

As Conan O'Brien soon becomes the longest-running host in late night TV, he goes on the road for a rare visit by an American show to the Communist island.

Ed Burns on his 'Brothers McMullen' break and surviving 'director's jail'

The writer/director/actor talks about the impetus behind his memoir, the adventurous creativity being cultivated on TV, and the lessons he's learned over his 20-year career.

'Focus': another box office disappointment for Will Smith

The actor’s latest film continues a string of poor performances at the box office. Could this be the end of his reliability to bring audiences to the theater?

The art of Syrian refugees sends a message. is anyone listening?

Syria's refugees are waiting for a new life. The artists among them are depicting this life in limbo — and their memories of the country they left behind.

Diversity sells — But Hollywood remains overwhelmingly white, male

Women and minorities continue to be under-represented on TV and in film, both behind and in front of the camera, according to a new study — even though diverse films and shows make more money.

Leonard Nimoy's advice to a biracial girl in 1968

When a young girl with a black mother and white father wrote to a teen magazine in 1968 about not fitting in, the "Star Trek" actor responded at length about how Spock navigated two cultures.

Leonard Nimoy's Mr. Spock taught us acceptance is highly logical

The "Star Trek" actor died Friday in Los Angeles, and NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans says Nimoy's signature role taught fans the power of accepting their differences rather than fighting them.