The Breakdown

Explaining Southern California's economy

Bullet Points: The utter pointlessness of banking fees

Wells Fargo is about do it. So is Bank of America. Huge financial institutions with billions in deposits are struggling with post-bailout legislation and passing costs on to their customers. People who've gotten used to swiping their debits cards for every imaginable transaction are about to see that service run them as much as $60 a month.

In the New York Times, Ron Lieber and Ann Carrns assess the pros and cons. But when you get right down to it, there basically are no pros. Here's why:

  • Credit unions offer branch deposits. Online banks get dinged for not having a physical place where you can hand over cash or checks to an actual human person. But they don't have a monopoly on old-school, bricks-and-mortar banking. Credit unions also have branch offices — and in many cases are members of networks, so you get a collection of branches that's comparable with the Big Banks.
  • Online banking is easy and technologically sophisticated. ING DIRECT, for example, offers a suite of checking accounts that actually earn interest. That's right, they pay you to hold your money. Setting up an account is a relatively simple process. And because money is pretty much just numbers flying around in the electronic ether, it really shouldn't be a problem to adapt yourself to this no-so-brave new world.
  • There's no risk to not using a Big Bank. Deposits at BofA are FDIC-insured. But so are deposits at online banks. Credit union deposits are also insured, by the National Credit Union Association (NCUA). 
  • Not using a Big Bank may actually be BETTER for the Big Bank. Back in late 2009, Arianna Huffington, along with a group of finance folks, got involved with a project called Move Your Money. The idea was to, in a manner of speaking, take from the rich and give to the poor. With in this case the poor being local banks. The upshot would be an surge in funding to "Main Street" banks, which might enable the kind of small-business lending that the country needs to recovery from the Great Recession. And the Big Banks would in turn be less likely to pose a massive risk to the entire system.

Follow Matthew DeBord and the DeBord Report on Twitter.

Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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