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Google goggles coming later this year

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Kimihiro Hoshino/AFP/Getty Images

The Google logo is seen at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, California. on September 2, 2011. AFP PHOTO/KIMIHIRO HOSHINO (Photo credit should read KIMIHIRO HOSHINO/AFP/Getty Images)

Eyeglasses. They're just so stupid, sitting there on your face, enabling you to do little more than see better and, in certain chunky black Buddy Holly-esque cases, branding you as a probable resident of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. But Google plans to change all that, with "heads up display glasses," according to the New York Times' Nick Bilton:

The glasses will send data to the cloud and then use things like Google Latitude to share location, Google Goggles to search images and figure out what is being looked at, and Google Maps to show other things nearby, the Google employee said. “You will be able to check in to locations with your friends through the glasses,” they added.

Everyone I spoke with who was familiar with the project repeatedly said that Google was not thinking about potential business models with the new glasses. Instead, they said, Google sees the project as an experiment that anyone will be able to join. If consumers take to the glasses when they are released later this year, then Google will explore possible revenue streams.

This kind of thing is right up Bilton's alley — vaguely superfuturistic, like something out of his book, "I Live in the Future and Here's How It Works" — but you have to wonder why Google would be pursuing this kind of hardware experiment. Then again, a wearable Google integration device that can dovetail and/or enable other project being pursued by Google X Lab (Google's secret skunkworks). Google goggles would certainly give you something to do why being ferried around in a Google car that drives itself.

Price? Reportedly $250-$600.

Follow Matthew DeBord and the DeBord Report on Twitter.

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