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TSA delays plans to allow small knives on board planes

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A TSA agent waits for passengers to use the TSA PreCheck lane being implemented by the Transportation Security Administration at Miami International Airport on Oct. 4, 2011.

The Transportation Security Administration said Monday it is postponing its plans to allow small knives on planes. TSA officials say they want more input from the traveling public and those who work in commercial air travel.

The Coalition of Flight Attendant Unions applauded the decision to postpone. The move to allow small knives six centimeters or less in length on planes has been opposed by flight attendants and families of 9/11 victims.

"The United States has banned all knives from commercial flights since the September 11, 2001, attacks for good reason: Knives were the terrorists' weapons of choice in bringing down four jetliners and murdering thousands of Americans," the coalition said in a statement. 

The TSA had planned to relax its policies, by allowing formerly prohibited items on board planes starting on Thursday. Other items it planned to allow were wiffle ball bats and hockey sticks.

TSA said the change in rules was part of a larger effort to focus on items that have the highest threat. 

But on Monday it said it will "temporarily delay" the rule changes, so it can get more feedback from the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC). The committee includes passenger advocates, law enforcement experts and aviation community representatives.

"This timing will enable TSA to incorporate the ASAC's feedback about the changes to the Prohibited Items List and continue workforce training," TSA said in the statement. The agency told KPCC it would not be providing additional information beyond its statement.

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