Explaining Southern California's economy

Moody's called bankrupt Stockton's debt 'low' last year

Stockton, CA Leads Nation In Rate Of Foreclosures

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A sign is seen in a deserted section of downtown Stockton. The city will declare bankruptcy, becoming the largest U.S. city ever to do so.

The headline story is that Stockton, Calif. is now the largest U.S. city to file for bankruptcy. The Northern California municipality failed to come to terms with its creditors during a state-mandated mediation period and set in motion a filing for Chapter 9, the city-government version of Chapter 11. The total debt load has been reported as $700 million, although other sources have put it at somewhere between $500 million and a billion. 

Stockton's story is being widely presented as a sad case of a city that tried to expand into being a bedroom community for the San Francisco Bay Area and got hammered by a combination of a busted housing boom and city retiree pension and health-care obligations. The loss of property tax revenue and the cost of taking care of former firefighters and cops forced the city to borrow too much money, and the debt load eventually became too great.

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The Euro rescue plan: A rundown of opinions

People walk by a National Bank of Greece

LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images

People walk by a National Bank of Greece in Athens on October 27, 2011. Greece reacted with measured relief on Thursday after European leaders sealed a deal to contain the eurozone debt crisis that slashes the country's huge debt by nearly a third. LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images

Has Europe finally solved its debt-crisis problem? Well, that depends on who you talk to. Yesterday, hot on the heels of the announcement that European financial leaders had labored into the wee hours to finally get their act together to rescue Greece and save the Euro, I heard an economist say she was pleased that Europe had finally agreed on a plan...to agree on a plan!

Yeah, not exactly a ringing endorsement of Europe's ability to right its listing ship of states.

Meanwhile, around the blogspshere, various voices weighed in. At Reuters, Felix Salmon took a deep dive into the matter of credit default swaps (CDS) on Greek debt (although it wasn't nearly as deep as some). You're not going to want to wade into this debate unless you're prepared to induce a pounding financial headache, but the topline summary is fairly simple.

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