Explaining Southern California's economy

Reportings: Jobless claims; bad economy; Great Aggregation Debate; Soros is worried

Early jobless-claim numbers for September surprise forecasters. But it could all be a cruel ruse by the economy: "'Apart from what might be an anomaly, the underlying trend in the labor force is still disappointing,” said Sean Incremona, a senior economist at 4Cast Inc. in New York. “There is a lot of economic uncertainty weighing on the broader economy.'" (BizWeek)

 

Could one person out of every 10 — the starry-eyed optimist — be right? Talk about fighting the current: "According to a Field Poll released Tuesday, 91% of California voters say the Golden State's economy is experiencing 'bad times.' It’s the third year in a row that more than 90% of voters have depicted the state's economy in a negative light." (LAT)

 

Business Insider's Henry Blodget does a little startup standup as the Great Aggregation Debate heats up. Just a whiff of paranoia entering the picture, however. (BI)

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California Trendwatch: Polarizing jobs, polarizing regions

Earlier this week, the UCLA Anderson Forecast released a report on the national and state economy that contained a rather disturbing trend analysis. Since the financial crisis, two California economies have emerged. On the coast, there's growth. Inland, there's near-stagnation. You can easily see this expressed in the Los Angeles region's unemployment numbers. LA is bad, at at 12.7 percent. But Riverside and San Bernadino counties are far worse, at 15.1 and 14.3, respectively.

The industries that are creating jobs in California are also disproportionately located on the coast. Inland, the blast wave of the the housing bust is still being felt, with industries like construction shedding jobs.

So, we have a polarization of economic growth, the to markedly different sub-states in the CA. Meanwhile, Lauren Dame recently produced this brief analysis of job polarization nationally, for the New America Foundation:

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